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 Occupy Wall Street 
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Looks like the OccuTard's lawyers tried to pull a fast one:
NY Daily News wrote:
Judge Lucy Billings, who signed Occupy Wall Street order, is an ACLU veteran
Hearing on the order to be held Tuesday with different judge
BY Barbara Ross , Greg B. Smith & Tracy Connor
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Originally Published: Tuesday, November 15 2011, 10:03 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 15 2011, 1:22 PM

When the cops raided Zuccotti Park, lawyers for Occupy Wall Street woke up a judge with a civil liberties background and asked for help.

Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Lucy Billings signed an early-morning order temporarily barring cops from keeping protesters and tents out of Zuccotti Park.

But within hours, she was off the case as court administrators prepared to randomly choose a new judge — and excluded Billings’ name from the list of candidates.

Billings’ biography notes that before she became a judge in 1997, she spent 25 years as a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union.

“I have devoted my career to public service, especially the disadvantaged in desperate circumstances,” she wrote in a 2007 pre-election statement.

Lawyers for Occupy Wall Street phoned Billings after cops moved into Zuccotti Park early Tuesday, evicted the protesters and got rid of their tents and other camp equipment.

Asked why they called her first, protest lawyer Daniel Alterman wouldn’t say, remarking that he’s not a “gossip guy.”

The lawyers also called an emergency hotline set up to assign judges to after-hours cases. A staffer told them that since Billings had already been contacted, she should handle the Zuccotti matter.

The city was also notified of the emergency application, but no one from the Law Department showed up to Billings’ home for a brief hearing, said protest lawyer Yetta Kurland.

At 6:30 a.m., Billings signed the hastily prepared order declaring cops cannot evict protesters who aren’t breaking the law or stop protesters from entering with tents.

Her involvement will be short-lived.

Court officials were scheduled to use a computer program to pick a new judge for an afternoon hearing on the restraining order — the proceeding that will determine if the tents can be erected again.

Billings’ name was not included because she usually handles real estate cases, court officials said.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/jud ... z1dnsBVrcY

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November 15th, 2011, 3:25 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Looks like another Obamaville will be shut down:
CBS DFW wrote:
Judge Denies Occupy Dallas Order Against City
November 15, 2011 11:05 AM

DALLAS (AP) – A federal judge has refused to grant an order sought by Occupy Dallas demonstrators to prevent the city from closing their campsite.

Protesters failed to get a temporary restraining order Tuesday. U.S. District Judge Jane Boyle earlier expressed concern that federal courts did not have jurisdiction.

The city last week alleged protesters had violated an Oct. 17 agreement to allow the campsite near Dallas City Hall. The city noted reports of an alleged sexual assault of a child at the site, the removal of a baby over possible endangerment and trespassing arrests.

A Nov. 12 deadline to comply has been extended.

Occupy Dallas officials said protesters are abiding by the deal.

Attorneys for the city and for Occupy Dallas did not immediately return messages Tuesday from The Associated Press.


http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2011/11/15/judge-denies-occupy-dallas-order-against-city/

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November 15th, 2011, 4:13 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
TheRealWags wrote:
Nice how they didn't even mention how the NYPD barred any media from observing the raid as well as shutting down the airspace over the park to prevent viewing from the air. Hmm, sounds an awful lot like your feared, dreaded Communism to, except its not from the OWS crowd, its from your local NYPD.

Daily Kos wrote:
In the hours since New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg sent in riot police to clear out Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park, stories of media suppression have been flying.

But this one quote from The New York Times really encapsulates Michael Bloomberg's respect for the First Amendment:

Quote:
Rosie Gray, a writer for The Village Voice, recounted telling a police officer, “I’m press!” She said the officer responded, “Not tonight.”


We'll just hold off on all those pesky rights until it's more convenient. Or not.

At this hour, a hearing is being held on the temporary restraining order issued earlier this morning that allowed protesters to return to Zuccotti Park. An order that Mayor Bloomberg has ignored. Stay tuned.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/11/1 ... Nottonight


Not too mention this:
Quote:
The Occupy Wall Street librarians tweeted the eviction all night: “NYPD destroying american cultural history, they’re destroying the documents, the books, the artwork of an event in our nation’s history … Right now, the NYPD are throwing over 5,000 books from our library into a dumpster. Will they burn them? … Call 311 or 212-639-9675 now and ask why Mayor Bloomberg is throwing the 5,554 books from our library into a dumpster.”


Stay classy Police. Way to protect and serve :rolleyes:

What a load of crap, but what do you expect from the Daily Kos? :roll:

First of all, while media weren't allowed inside the park during the raid for safety reasons, they were in the vicinity videotaping and photographing the events as they occured. Furthermore, WABC had a helicopter in the air filming, so Daily Kos is just making stuff up yet again.

In addition, all of the personal property from the park was taken to the Sanitation Dept. where it can be reclaimed. None of it was burned or destroyed. Yet another lie from the Daily Kos.

Here are the books waiting to be claimed:
Image

And here is the helicopter video footage from WABC:

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November 15th, 2011, 5:56 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Na na na na....na na na na....hey hey hey....goodbye. :D
New York Times wrote:
4:53 P.M. |Judge Upholds City Ban on Camping in Park.

A state Supreme Court judge upheld the city's right to enforce rules that bar the Occupy Wall Street protesters from camping at Zuccotti Park.

The judge, Michael D. Stallman, wrote in his ruling Tuesday afternoon, "The court is mindful of movants' First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and peaceable assembly."

But he added, quoting from precedent, "Even protected speech is not equally permissible in all places and at all times."

He said that the protesters "had not demonstrated that the rules adopted by the owners of the property, concededly after the demonstrations began, are not reasonable time place and manner restrictions permitted under the First Amendment."

During a hearing that lasted about an hour and 20 minutes in State Supreme Court in Manhattan, lawyers for the protesters had told Justice Stallman that the actions of the city and the owner of Zuccotti Park impinged on their clients' First Amendment protections.

The lawyers took particular exception with the fact that Brookfield Office Properties implemented rules after the protests had already begun back in September.

"They issued these rules after the activity started in order to try to limit the activity," said Arthur Schwartz, a lawyer representing the Transport Workers Union, the Working Families Party and New York Communities for Change, organizations that have joined in the protesters' cause.

"There was no particular emergency this morning, there was no particular activity that was going on that created a public nuisance this morning that required the police to come in en masse," Mr. Schwartz added.

The protesters were represented at the hearing by five lawyers for the National Lawyers Guild, which has provided legal defense for the movement since it started.

A lawyer for Brookfield said that the company had no problem with people expressing their First Amendment rights in the park. But the protesters needed to be removed because their tents and other equipment created a safety risk and prevented other people from using the park, said the lawyer, Douglas H. Flaum. Brookfield would welcome the protesters back without the tents and other permanent structures in tow, Mr. Flaum said.

"It is not meant to be a tent city," Mr. Flaum said. "There are very specific health and safety concerns."

Still, he added, Brookfield is not beholden to some of the First Amendment restrictions because it is a private company.

Alan Levine, one of the civil rights lawyers representing the protesters, said that not allowing the protesters to return with their sleeping bags and tents was akin to stifling their message.

"The power of the symbolic speech resides in the fact that it is a 24-hour occupation," Mr. Levine said in court. "It an essential part of their speech that they are able to protect themselves from the weather."

Despite the protesters' constitutional protections, they were violating the parks' purpose for the public, said Sheryl Neufeld, a lawyer for the city.

"It requires them to maintain it in a manner that is accessible to all, all the time," Ms. Neufeld said. "The protesters took over the park for their own means."

The courtroom was packed with reporters and supporters of the Occupy movement. One of them, Jennifer Waller, sitting in the front row in a purple scarf and black knit cap, was the named plaintiff in the protesters' lawsuit against the city.

Before the hearing started, the Occupy lawyers blasted the way in which the city raided the encampment.

"Bloomberg, by going in like a little rodent in the middle of the night, caused us to reach out to get an emergency ruling," Daniel L. Alterman, one of the lawyers, said of the move to get a judge to restrain the city of blocking protesters from the park.

- John Eligon


http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/15/updates-on-the-clearing-of-zuccotti-park/?src=twt&twt=cityroom#city-files-papers-opposing-bar-on-zuccotti-eviction

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November 15th, 2011, 6:11 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
These idiots don't even care about their dogs:
NBC Bay Area wrote:
Deadly Dog Disease Spreads at Occupy SF
By Chris Roberts | Tuesday, Nov 15, 2011 | Updated 1:07 PM PST

Don't bring your dogs to Justin Herman Plaza, Occupiers.

Three dogs residing at the Occupy SF encampment by The Embarcadero have tested positive for a highly contagious disease called the parvovirus, according to the San Francisco Examiner.

The San Francisco SPCA and city Animal Care and Control visited the camp on Monday to offer free veterinary service to the dozens of dogs at the camp, according to the newspaper. Some dog owners took their pooches to the makeshift vet; others accused officials of spreading bad publicity.

Parvovirus results in vomiting and bloody diarrhea, according to the newspaper.

The parvovirus isn't the only affliction to have befallen dogs at the camp, the SPCA says -- kennel cough, a highly contagious respiratory illness, is likely flourishing as well.


http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Deadly-Dog-Disease-Spreads-at-Occupy-SF-133910733.html

With people pooping and peeing all over the place, I'm not at all surprised that there are diseases spreading around.

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November 15th, 2011, 6:16 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Wags, I get yer vibe on where you stand on the OWS stuff, and I can respect that. but im starting to get a very "anti police" vibe from you. am I reading things correctly?

While like all things with a large group of people, a few bad eggs definatly exist, but i couldn't imagine the hell that life would become without the police around.....

lets assume that the reports are correct and these Occupy people are causing too many problems for regular folk...how would YOU disban them differently than the police are now?


November 16th, 2011, 5:43 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
The OccuTards along with their union buddies plan on doing this in New York, Detroit, and several other places as well:
CBS LA wrote:
‘Occupy LA’ Protest Expected To Cause Traffic Delays Thursday
November 16, 2011 9:34 AM

LOS ANGELES (CBS) — A coalition of labor unions and community groups have announced plans for a massive march in support of the “Occupy LA” encampment.

More than 1,000 protesters are planning to shut down streets in downtown Los Angeles at 7 a.m. Thursday.

They will meet at the Bank of America plaza on Hope Street and march to the corner of Figueroa and Fourth streets, where they plan to shut down the intersection and drop large banners from nearby overpasses.

Demonstrators say rush hour drivers should expect serious delays and street closures in downtown Los Angeles near the 110 Freeway.

There will be additional marches around noon Thursday.


http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2011/11/16/occupy-la-protest-expected-to-cause-traffic-delays-thursday/

I'm hoping for an epidemic of "brake failures" tomorrow. :D

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November 16th, 2011, 6:51 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Looks like there's been several "unreported" until now incidents at Occupy LA:
LA Times wrote:
L.A. NOW
Occupy L.A.: 5 charged with crimes including lewd conduct, battery
November 15, 2011 | 1:58 pm

Five people at the Occupy L.A. encampment have been charged with separate crimes, including a man who allegedly exposed himself and commited a sex act in front of a child, officials said Tuesday.

Angele Chaidez, 21, faces one count of lewd conduct and one count of indecent exposure for allegedly exposing himself and masturbating in front of several people, including children, Friday on the south steps of City Hall, said prosecutors with the L.A. city attorney's office.

That same day, Zachary Isaac, 21, allegedly entered a woman's tent and called her “Satan.” After the woman asked Isaac to leave, he allegedly punched her in the face with a closed fist. Prosecutors charged him with one count of battery resulting in injury.

Robert Holland Jr., 31, allegedly waved a knife at another person on Halloween, then resisted arrest, prosecutors said. He was charged with one count of assault with a deadly weapon, one count of brandishing a deadly weapon, one count of disturbing the peace and one count of resisting arrest.

Michael Howard Thomson, 51, was charged with two counts of battery and one count of resisting arrest after getting into a physical altercation with a parent over a child, prosecutors said.

Thompson is accused of approaching a man in a tent Oct. 11 and pushing him while attempting to grab a 2-year old child, prosecutors said.

Another person tried to intervene and Thompson punched him in the face, prosecutors said. When police arrived, Thompson allegedly refused to cooperate and violently resisted officers’ efforts to detain him.

Farid Ahntab, 24, faces one count each of possession of a deadly weapon, brandishing a deadly weapon, assault with a deadly weapon and resisting arrest following three separate incidents at the camp.

He allegedly brandished a knife at officers Oct. 29, tried to light a food vendor on fire with a lighter Nov. 4 and resisted arrest Nov. 11.


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/11/occupy-la-five-charged-with-crimes.html

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November 16th, 2011, 6:55 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Sounds like tomorrow is gonna be fun:
Fox News wrote:
Angry 'Occupy' Protesters Plan to Take It to the Streets, as Some Threaten Violence

Published November 16, 2011
| FoxNews.com

NEW YORK – Organizers of protests and marches Thursday in New York City for the two-month anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement are calling for non-violent demonstrations, but that hasn't stopped some protesters from demanding a fiery confrontation with authorities.

"On the 17th, we’re going to burn New York City to the ground," one protester can be heard saying in video recorded after the protesters' home base, Zuccotti Park, was cleared Tuesday.

“No more talking. They’ve got guns, we’ve got bottles. They’ve got bricks, we’ve got rocks…in a few days you’re going to see what a Molotov cocktail can do to Macy’s," the unidentified man spouted in the video.

There is no indication that the man was part of a wider plan to carry out violence, though police across the country have been on guard against the potential for such threats in the Occupy movement.

The protesters Thursday will be joined by some angry city leaders who have publicly denounced Mayor Michael Bloomberg for the raid early Tuesday that dismantled the tent city in the plaza. Protesters were allowed to return that night, two at a time, but police were enforcing a ban on sleeping there.

Organizers say the loss of the campsite in Zuccotti Park may help broaden the movement. The head of the group's finances says it will open up a dialogue with organizers in other cities and take the protest to the next level.

Tuesday's raid was the third in a span of three days across the country. Police broke up camps Sunday in Portland, Ore., and Monday in Oakland, Calif.

Late Tuesday night, about a dozen Occupy Wall Street protesters were in Zuccotti Park, talking and trying to stay awake.

They were sitting on the park's marble benches, occasionally chanting "We are the 99 percent" and other protest slogans as about 30 police officers were looking on.

A judge ruled Tuesday that the protesters could return to Zuccotti but could not set up camp.

Some of the overnight protesters were holding up signs.

One reads "Police, who do you protect really?" It's posted on the metal barricade that was constructed around the park after the protesters were hauled out of the park during a police raid Tuesday.

A handful of protesters also gathered at a nearby McDonald's, resting their heads on a table.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/11/16/oc ... z1dvioz25Z

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November 16th, 2011, 11:37 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Sly: I'm gonna give you a new tag for this (bowel) movement that is infecting the sounds minds of a once proud country.

From now on let them be called:

Occomunist. It's what they are, it's what they believe, and they will not be happy until the unrealistic utopia of Leninville, becomes there reality.

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November 17th, 2011, 9:00 am
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Quote:
Statement of Autonomy
Passed by the General Assembly at Occupy Wall Street

Occupy Wall Street is a people’s movement. It is party-less, leaderless, by the people and for the people. It is not a business, a political party, an advertising campaign or a brand. It is not for sale.

We welcome all, who, in good faith, petition for a redress of grievances through non-violence. We provide a forum for peaceful assembly of individuals to engage in participatory as opposed to partisan debate and democracy. We welcome dissent.

Any statement or declaration not released through the General Assembly and made public online at http://www.nycga.net should be considered independent of Occupy Wall Street.

We wish to clarify that Occupy Wall Street is not and never has been affiliated with any established political party, candidate or organization. Our only affiliation is with the people.

The people who are working together to create this movement are its sole and mutual caretakers. If you have chosen to devote resources to building this movement, especially your time and labor, then it is yours.

Any organization is welcome to support us with the knowledge that doing so will mean questioning your own institutional frameworks of work and hierarchy and integrating our principles into your modes of action.

SPEAK WITH US, NOT FOR US.

Occupy Wall Street values collective resources, dignity, integrity and autonomy above money. We have not made endorsements. All donations are accepted anonymously and are transparently allocated via consensus by the General Assembly or the Operational Spokes Council.

We acknowledge the existence of professional activists who work to make our world a better place. If you are representing, or being compensated by an independent source while participating in our process, please disclose your affiliation at the outset. Those seeking to capitalize on this movement or undermine it by appropriating its message or symbols are not a part of Occupy Wall Street.

We stand in solidarity. We are Occupy Wall Street.

http://www.nycga.net/resources/statement-of-autonomy/

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November 17th, 2011, 9:24 am
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
regularjoe12 wrote:
Wags, I get yer vibe on where you stand on the OWS stuff, and I can respect that. but im starting to get a very "anti police" vibe from you. am I reading things correctly?

While like all things with a large group of people, a few bad eggs definatly exist, but i couldn't imagine the hell that life would become without the police around.....

lets assume that the reports are correct and these Occupy people are causing too many problems for regular folk...how would YOU disban them differently than the police are now?

I'm not anti-police, far from it. I do, however, expect them to act professionally and do their job to the best of their ability. Perhaps this might help to explain a bit, as I said in the Sly lover thread:
Quote:
it is the person that is actually elected's responsibility to do the right thing, NO MATTER WHAT. THAT is what is means to serve the people.
Granted police officers are not elected, however they still SERVE the public and that, to me, means they are supposed to do the right thing. Stand up for the 'little guy' if you will.
Quote:
Downey: What did we do wrong? We did nothing wrong.
Dawson: Yeah, we did. We were supposed to fight for the people who couldn't fight for themselves. We were supposed to fight for Willie.
Do I hold the police to a higher standard? You bet your rectum I do, why shouldn't I?

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November 17th, 2011, 9:40 am
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
Moyers wrote:
How Wall Street Occupied America
by Bill Moyers | November 4, 2011 - 9:00am
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This article is adapted from a speech Bill Moyers gave in October at Public Citizen's fortieth-anniversary gala.

During the prairie revolt that swept the Great Plains in 1890, populist orator Mary Elizabeth Lease exclaimed, "Wall Street owns the country.... Money rules.... Our laws are the output of a system which clothes rascals in robes and honesty in rags. The [political] parties lie to us and the political speakers mislead us."

She should see us now. John Boehner calls on the bankers, holds out his cup and offers them total obeisance from the House majority if only they fill it. Barack Obama criticizes bankers as "fat cats," then invites them to dine at a pricey New York restaurant where the tasting menu runs to $195 a person.

That's now the norm, and they get away with it. The president has raised more money from employees of banks, hedge funds and private equity managers than any Republican candidate, including Mitt Romney. Inch by inch he has conceded ground to them while espousing populist rhetoric that his very actions betray.

Let's name this for what it is: hypocrisy made worse, the further perversion of democracy. Our politicians are little more than money launderers in the trafficking of power and policy--fewer than six degrees of separation from the spirit and tactics of Tony Soprano.

Why New York's Zuccotti Park is filled with people is no mystery. Reporters keep scratching their heads and asking, "Why are you here?" But it's clear they are occupying Wall Street because Wall Street has occupied the country. And that's why in public places across the nation workaday Americans are standing up in solidarity. Did you see the sign a woman was carrying at a fraternal march in Iowa the other day? It read, I Can't Afford to Buy a Politician So I Bought This Sign. Americans have learned the hard way that when rich organizations and wealthy individuals shower Washington with millions in campaign contributions, they get what they want.

In his Pulitzer Prize-winning book The Radicalism of the American Revolution, historian Gordon Wood says that our nation discovered its greatness "by creating a prosperous free society belonging to obscure people with their workaday concerns and pecuniary pursuits of happiness." This democracy, he said, changed the lives of "hitherto neglected and despised masses of common laboring people."

Those words moved me when I read them. They moved me because Henry and Ruby Moyers were "common laboring people." My father dropped out of the fourth grade and never returned to school because his family needed him to pick cotton to help make ends meet. Mother managed to finish the eighth grade before she followed him into the fields. They were tenant farmers when the Great Depression knocked them down and almost out. The year I was born my father was making $2 a day working on the highway to Oklahoma City. He never took home more than $100 a week in his working life, and he made that only when he joined the union in the last job he held. I was one of the poorest white kids in town, but in many respects I was the equal of my friend who was the daughter of the richest man in town. I went to good public schools, had the use of a good public library, played sandlot baseball in a good public park and traveled far on good public roads with good public facilities to a good public university. Because these public goods were there for us, I never thought of myself as poor. When I began to piece the story together years later, I came to realize that people like the Moyerses had been included in the American deal. "We, the People" included us.

* * *

It's heartbreaking to see what has become of that bargain. Nowadays it's every man for himself. How did this happen? The rise of the money power in our time goes back forty years. We can pinpoint the date. On August 23, 1971, a corporate lawyer named Lewis Powell--a board member of the death-dealing tobacco giant Philip Morris and a future justice of the Supreme Court--released a confidential memorandum for his friends at the US Chamber of Commerce. We look back on it now as a call to arms for class war waged from the top down.

Recall the context of Powell's memo. Big business was being forced to clean up its act. Even Republicans had signed on. In 1970 President Nixon put his signature on the National Environmental Policy Act and named a White House Council to promote environmental quality. A few months later millions of Americans turned out for Earth Day. Nixon then agreed to create the Environmental Protection Agency. Congress acted swiftly to pass tough amendments to the Clean Air Act, and the EPA announced the first air pollution standards. There were new regulations directed at lead paint and pesticides. Corporations were no longer getting away with murder.

Powell was shocked by what he called an "attack on the American free enterprise system." Not just from a few "extremists of the left" but also from "perfectly respectable elements of society," including the media, politicians and leading intellectuals. Fight back and fight back hard, he urged his compatriots. Build a movement. Set speakers loose across the country. Take on prominent institutions of public opinion--especially the universities, the media and the courts. Keep television programs "monitored the same way textbooks should be kept under constant surveillance." And above all, recognize that political power must be "assiduously [sic] cultivated; and that when necessary, it must be used aggressively and with determination" and "without embarrassment."

Powell imagined the Chamber of Commerce as a council of war. Since business executives had "little stomach for hard-nosed contest with their critics" and "little skill in effective intellectual and philosophical debate," they should create think tanks, legal foundations and front groups of every stripe. These groups could, he said, be aligned into a united front through "careful long-range planning and implementation...consistency of action over an indefinite period of years, in the scale of financing available only through joint effort, and in the political power available only through united action and united organizations."

The public wouldn't learn of the memo until after Nixon appointed Powell to the Supreme Court that same year, 1971. By then his document had circulated widely in corporate suites. Within two years the board of the Chamber of Commerce had formed a task force of forty business executives--from US Steel, GE, GM, Phillips Petroleum, 3M, Amway, and ABC and CBS (two media companies, we should note). Their assignment was to coordinate the crusade, put Powell's recommendations into effect and push the corporate agenda. Powell had set in motion a revolt of the rich. As historian Kim Phillips-Fein subsequently wrote, "Many who read the memo cited it afterward as inspiration for their political choices."

They chose swiftly. The National Association of Manufacturers announced that it was moving its main offices to Washington. In 1971 only 175 firms had registered lobbyists in the capital; by 1982 nearly 2,500 did. Corporate PACs increased from fewer than 300 in 1976 to more than 1,200 by the mid-'80s. From Powell's impetus came the Business Roundtable, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, the Manhattan Institute, Citizens for a Sound Economy (precursor to what we now know as Americans for Prosperity) and other organizations united in pushing back against political equality and shared prosperity. They triggered an economic transformation that would in time touch every aspect of our lives.

The Chamber of Commerce, in response to the memo, doubled its membership, tripled its budget and stepped up its lobbying efforts. It's going stronger than ever. Most recently, it called in its agents in Congress to kill a bill to provide healthcare to 9/11 first responders for illnesses linked to their duty on that day. The bill would have paid for their medical care by ending a special tax loophole exploited by foreign corporations with business interests in America. The Chamber, along with nearly 1,300 business and trade groups, urged Congress to pass the new tax bill, signed into law just before this past Christmas and filled with all kinds of stocking stuffers, including about fifty tax breaks for businesses. The bill gave some of our biggest banks, financial companies and insurance firms another year's exemption to shield their foreign profits from being taxed here in the United States; among the beneficiaries were giants Citigroup, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, all of which survived the financial debacle of their own making because taxpayers bailed them out in 2008.

The coalition got another powerful jolt of adrenaline in the late '70s from the wealthy right-winger who had served as Nixon's treasury secretary, William Simon. His book A Time for Truth argued that "funds generated by business" must "rush by multimillions" into conservative causes to uproot the institutions and the "heretical strategy" of the New Deal. He called on "men of action in the capitalist world" to mount "a veritable crusade" against progressive America. BusinessWeek (October 12, 1974) somberly explained that "it will be a bitter pill for many Americans to swallow the idea of doing with less so that big business can have more."

Those "men of action in the capitalist world" were not content with their wealth just to buy more homes, more cars, more planes, more vacations and more gizmos than anyone else. They were determined to buy more democracy than anyone else. And they succeeded beyond their expectations. After their forty-year "veritable crusade" against our institutions, laws and regulations--against the ideas, norms and beliefs that helped to create America's iconic middle class--the Gilded Age is back with a vengeance.

If you want to see the story pulled together in one compelling narrative, read Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class, by political scientists Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson. They wanted to know how America had turned into a society starkly divided into winners and losers. They found the culprit: the revolt triggered by Lewis Powell, fired up by William Simon and fueled by rich corporations and wealthy individuals. "Step by step," they write, "and debate by debate America's public officials have rewritten the rules of American politics and the American economy in ways that have benefited the few at the expense of the many."

There you have it. They bought off the gatekeeper, got inside and gamed the system. As the rich and powerful got richer and more powerful, they owned and operated the government, "saddling Americans with greater debt, tearing new holes in the safety net, and imposing broad financial risks on Americans as workers, investors, and taxpayers." Now, write Hacker and Pierson, the United States is looking more and more like "the capitalist oligarchies, like Brazil, Mexico, and Russia," where most of the wealth is concentrated at the top while the bottom grows larger and larger with everyone in between just barely getting by.

The revolt of the plutocrats was ratified by the Supreme Court in its notorious Citizens United decision last year. Rarely have so few imposed such damage on so many. When five pro-corporate conservative justices gave "artificial legal entities" the same rights of "free speech" as humans, they told our corporate sovereigns that the sky's the limit when it comes to their pouring money into political campaigns.

The ink was hardly dry on the Citizens United decision when the Chamber of Commerce organized a covertly funded front and rained cash into the 2010 campaigns. According to the Sunlight Foundation, corporate front groups spent$126 million in the fall of 2010 while hiding the identities of the donors. Another corporate cover group--the American Action Network--spent more than $26 million of undisclosed corporate money in just six Senate races and twenty-six House elections. And Karl Rove's groups, American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS, seized on Citizens United to raise and spend at least $38 million, which NBC News said came from "a small circle of extremely wealthy Wall Street hedge fund and private equity moguls"--all determined to water down financial reforms that might prevent another collapse of the financial system. Jim Hightower has said it well: today's proponents of corporate plutocracy "have simply elevated money itself above votes, establishing cold, hard cash as the real coin of political power."

No wonder so many Americans have felt that sense of political impotence that historian Lawrence Goodwyn described as "the mass resignation" of people who believe in the "dogma of democracy" on a superficial public level but whose hearts no longer burn with the conviction that they are part of the deal. Against such odds, discouragement comes easily. But if the generations before us had given up, slaves would still be waiting on their masters, women would still be turned away from the voting booths on election day and workers would still be committing a crime if they organized.

* * *

So take heart from the past, and don't ever count the people out. During the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the Industrial Revolution created extraordinary wealth at the top and excruciating misery at the bottom. Embattled citizens rose up. Into their hearts, wrote the progressive Kansas journalist William Allen White, "had come a sense that their civilization needed recasting, that their government had fallen into the hands of self-seekers, that a new relation should be established between the haves and have-nots." Not content to wring their hands and cry "Woe is us," everyday citizens researched the issues, organized to educate their neighbors, held rallies, made speeches, petitioned and canvassed, marched and marched again. They plowed the fields and planted the seeds--sometimes on bloody ground--that twentieth-century leaders used to restore "the general welfare" as a pillar of American democracy. They laid down the now-endangered markers of a civilized society: legally ordained minimum wages, child labor laws, workers' safety and compensation laws, pure foods and safe drugs, Social Security, Medicare and rules that promote competitive markets over monopolies and cartels.

The lesson is clear: Democracy doesn't begin at the top; it begins at the bottom, when flesh-and-blood human beings fight to rekindle what Arlo Guthrie calls "The Patriot's Dream."

Living now here but for fortune
Placed by fate's mysterious schemes
Who'd believe that we're the ones asked
To try to rekindle the patriot's dreams

Arise sweet destiny, time runs short
All of your patience has heard their retort
Hear us now for alone we can't seem
To try to rekindle the patriot's dreams

Can you hear the words being whispered
All along the American stream
Tyrants freed, the just are imprisoned
Try to rekindle the patriot's dreams

Ah but perhaps too much is being asked of too few
You and your children with nothing to do
Hear us now for alone we can't seem
To try to rekindle the patriot's dreams

Who, in these cynical times, with democracy on the ropes and America's body politic pounded again and again by the blows of organized money--who would dream such a radical thing? Look around.

(c) 2011 Bill Moyers

http://www.smirkingchimp.com/thread/bil ... ed-america

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November 17th, 2011, 12:22 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
WarEr4Christ wrote:
Sly: I'm gonna give you a new tag for this (bowel) movement that is infecting the sounds minds of a once proud country.

From now on let them be called:

Occomunist. It's what they are, it's what they believe, and they will not be happy until the unrealistic utopia of Leninville, becomes there reality.

OccuCommies rolls off the tongue better IMO, but I have tons of names for them, as you've already seen. The funniest new one is "The American Arab Spring in need of Irish Spring". :lol:

Anyway, I'm watching live feeds of the idiots in New York now and am awaiting the inevitable skull bashing to commence. Later on, I'm looking forward to several incidents of protesters being hit by cars as they intend to shut down bridges in atleast 35 cities. All children are taught not to play in traffic, but the average 5 year old has more common sense than these morons do. Darwinism at it's finest. :cheers:

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November 17th, 2011, 12:31 pm
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Post Re: Occupy Wall Street
NY Post wrote:
OWS protester busted for allegedly threatening to hurl Molotov cocktails at Macy's
By KIRSTAN CONLEY, TIM PERONE and KENNETH GARGER

Last Updated: 7:38 AM, November 17, 2011

Posted: 7:50 PM, November 16, 2011

Cops this evening arrested an Occupy Wall Street protester for allegedly threatening to throw Molotov cocktails at Macy’s tomorrow during the group’s city-wide demonstration.

“On the 17th, we going to burn New York City to the f-cking ground,” Nkrumah Tinsley, 29, shouted Tuesday amongst a crowd of his fellow demonstrators, cops said.

Tinsley was also quoted making a similar quote in today’s Metro newspaper.

“In a few days they’re going to see what a Molotov cocktail can do to Macy’s,” Tinsley also allegedly vowed, according to a video posted on YouTube.

“They got guns! We got bottles!”

Tinsley was arrested around 5 p.m. at Zuccotti Park.

As he was hauled away, Tinsley repeatedly shouted profanities, including "F--k you guys!" at least 10 times.

About 10 of his fellow demonstrators followed him and started jeering at the officers.

“You do not serve and protect us anymore,” said Kanaska Carter,26. "They’re slowing trying to deteriorate the movement, but it’s not going to happen,” she said referring to the NYPD.

Police spokesman Paul Browne said the NYPD became concerned after seeing the video and reading the newspaper article because of the detailed nature of the threats.

“There was specificity as to the date, location and method of firebombing,” Browne said, adding that Tinsley also mentioned attacking the New York Stock Exchange.

“That level of specificity and that level of anger raised concern for both us and the Fire Department.

“This is an individual we are concerned about and we wanted to make sure we apprehended him before tomorrow,” Browne said.

Tinsley was charged with making a terroristic threat. Cops tonight were executing a search warrant at a Bronx home on University Avenue.

It’s not his first run-in with cops since the OWS protests began.

He was arrested on Oct. 26 for allegedly punching a cop who was trying to issue him a summons for disorderly conduct during a protest.

He was charged with assault.

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manh ... z1dyt7tYgr

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November 17th, 2011, 12:33 pm
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