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 Secret Service apparently not doing their job 
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Post Secret Service apparently not doing their job
Is it time to revisit the Secret Service's mandate?
Politico wrote:
Darrell Issa hits Secret Service protection
By KENDALL BREITMAN | 9/30/14 6:12 AM EDT Updated: 9/30/14 7:48 AM EDT

Ahead of his hearing Tuesday on the White House fence-jumper, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) says he’s “extremely concerned” about the Secret Service failure to secure the White House.

“Most organizations have acceptable losses, in other words they’re right 97 percent of the time. In the case of the Secret Service, they have to succeed 100 percent of the time,” Issa, the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, said on NBC’s “Nightly News” on Monday. “I’m extremely concerned.”

On Tuesday, Julia Pierson, the director of the Secret Service, will testify before the committee to address growing concerns around the agency’s handling of security at the White House.

The Washington Post published an article examining an incident in 2011 in which it took agents four days to learn that gunshots had hit the White House. On Monday, the Post reported that a man who jumped the fence of the White House was able to make it all the way into the East Room before he was tackled by an agent.

“It’s clear that something needs to be done, and something needs to be done drastically,” said ranking committee member Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.). “It’s also clear that they need to have a ‘Come to Jesus’ moment.”

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) said on Tuesday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” that the recent events have caused him to worry about the agency’s effectiveness.

“I worry about leadership, I worry about protocol and I worry about training,” Chaffetz said. “This projection of weakness, I’m afraid, is going to invite more attacks.”


Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/09/d ... z3Enx3J7HF
CNN wrote:
Officials: Fence jumper made it into East Room of White House
By Dana Bash, Jim Acosta and Deirdre Walsh, CNN
updated 8:52 AM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014

Washington (CNN) -- The man who jumped the White House fence earlier this month and breached the mansion's doors actually made it farther than originally thought, officials said Monday.

Omar Gonzalez, a 42-year-old Iraq war veteran who had a knife in his pocket, overcame one Secret Service officer and ran into the East Room of the White House, where he was then subdued, a federal law enforcement said.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who was provided the information by whistleblowers during his congressional investigation into the incident, also confirmed the details of what now appears to be a wild chase through the main floor of the White House, first reported by the Washington Post.

The Secret Service had previously stated that Gonzalez was stopped after entering the front door of the North Portico.

Gonzalez ran through much of the main floor, past a stairway that leads up to the first family's residence, and was ultimately stopped at the far southern end of the East Room. He also reached the doorway to the Green Room, an area that looks out on the South Lawn.

No shots were fired inside the White House, the federal law official said.

The Secret Service has not yet commented on the new details.

"I could not be more proud of the individual agents, but I worry that Director (Julia) Pierson and the leadership there at the Secret Service is failing them," Chaffetz said Monday on "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

Pierson will face tough questions at an already-scheduled hearing on Tuesday before the House Oversight Committee.

A Republican from Utah who sits on the committee, said he wants to know why an audible alarm in the White House had been muted after ushers said it was making too many noises.
White House encourages 'perspective' after Secret Service

And shortly after the incident earlier this month, the Secret Service issued a statement saying officers "showed tremendous restraint and discipline in dealing with" Gonzalez.
Chaffetz said he has a problem with that, too.

"I don't want tremendous restraint," he said. "I want to see overwhelming force to deter somebody. When you have the situation where you have the apparent lax security, you're unfortunately going to invite more attacks. And that's the concern."

Pierson sent a letter to committee chairman Darrell Issa last Friday raising concerns about an holding open discussion on security issues and urged the chairman to allow some of her testimony to take place in a classified setting.

"Simply put, publicly airing the very security measures employed by the Secret Service and the various challenges we confront at the White House complex will arm those who desire to cause injury - or worse - to the President and First Family with critical information, and doing so would be beyond reckless," Pierson wrote.

CNN has learned from a Democratic source on the Oversight Committee that Issa has agreed to Pierson's request, and will hold a separate, classified session on Tuesday.

The top Democrat on the committee, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Maryland, praised the decision to protect the agency's mission.

"This is not a Democratic issue or a Republican issue, but an American issue, and the last thing we should do is give people like Gonzalez a road map for how to attack the President or other officials," Cummings said in a written statement to CNN.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/29/politics/ ... ?hpt=hp_t2
Time for some heads to roll IMO. Perhaps a reorg and/or a 're-purposing' (for lack of a better term at the moment) is needed. I know their original pervue was to stop counterfit currency, perhaps its time to expand the role of the Marine Sentries stationed there.

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September 30th, 2014, 9:30 am
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
I am learning that it's also up to them to stop the hacks comming from overseas to major corporations as well. The Target hack, The Home Depot hack, Michaels, Harbor freight, Davids Bridal, and more. all this falls under their "watchful eye", all of those buisnesses have been hacked and exposed MILLIONS of card numbers to theives in just the past year. (over 5 million cards from the Home Depot hack alone)

SOMEONE sucks at their job....

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September 30th, 2014, 10:34 am
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
regularjoe12 wrote:
I am learning that it's also up to them to stop the hacks comming from overseas to major corporations as well. The Target hack, The Home Depot hack, Michaels, Harbor freight, Davids Bridal, and more. all this falls under their "watchful eye", all of those buisnesses have been hacked and exposed MILLIONS of card numbers to theives in just the past year. (over 5 million cards from the Home Depot hack alone)

SOMEONE sucks at their job....
Hmm, didn't know that. Seems to me though that the NSA, with all the data they're stealing and storing, should've known about these hacks well before hand. Perhaps there's just too much data for them to sift through....whodathunkit?

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September 30th, 2014, 10:58 am
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
TheRealWags wrote:
regularjoe12 wrote:
I am learning that it's also up to them to stop the hacks comming from overseas to major corporations as well. The Target hack, The Home Depot hack, Michaels, Harbor freight, Davids Bridal, and more. all this falls under their "watchful eye", all of those buisnesses have been hacked and exposed MILLIONS of card numbers to theives in just the past year. (over 5 million cards from the Home Depot hack alone)

SOMEONE sucks at their job....
Hmm, didn't know that. Seems to me though that the NSA, with all the data they're stealing and storing, should've known about these hacks well before hand. Perhaps there's just too much data for them to sift through....whodathunkit?


To be honest I have been hating on the FBI about it untill recently. I was corrected and told that since it falls under a financial problem category it is in the hands of the secret service.

Whomever it is...THEY SUCK! How many fortune 500 companies need to be hit from Mother Russia before we find a way to stop it?

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September 30th, 2014, 12:13 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
regularjoe12 wrote:
TheRealWags wrote:
regularjoe12 wrote:
I am learning that it's also up to them to stop the hacks comming from overseas to major corporations as well. The Target hack, The Home Depot hack, Michaels, Harbor freight, Davids Bridal, and more. all this falls under their "watchful eye", all of those buisnesses have been hacked and exposed MILLIONS of card numbers to theives in just the past year. (over 5 million cards from the Home Depot hack alone)

SOMEONE sucks at their job....
Hmm, didn't know that. Seems to me though that the NSA, with all the data they're stealing and storing, should've known about these hacks well before hand. Perhaps there's just too much data for them to sift through....whodathunkit?
To be honest I have been hating on the FBI about it untill recently. I was corrected and told that since it falls under a financial problem category it is in the hands of the secret service.

Whomever it is...THEY SUCK! How many fortune 500 companies need to be hit from Mother Russia before we find a way to stop it?
Until those fortune 500 companies start losing money, nothing is likely to happen. I do find it surprising that Apple & Google are making it their OSes more secure (which makes it more difficult for hackers); a win for consumers but not so much for the Govt.

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September 30th, 2014, 12:20 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.


September 30th, 2014, 12:55 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
rao wrote:
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.



you are kidding me right? I work in the finiancial world. these have done MAJOR damage. You do not want to know how many of your tax dollars are going to insured financial institutions through either the NCUA or FDIC.

Rao... the target and Home Depot breaches have caused MAJOR losses...major!

let me put this into perspective. The C.U. I work for has seen over 1/2 a mil in fraud due to the Home Depot hack alone. we only had approxamatly 8000 cards compromised. do the math, over 5 million cards were compromised...

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September 30th, 2014, 1:16 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
regularjoe12 wrote:
rao wrote:
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.



you are kidding me right? I work in the finiancial world. these have done MAJOR damage. You do not want to know how many of your tax dollars are going to insured financial institutions through either the NCUA or FDIC.

Rao... the target and Home Depot breaches have caused MAJOR losses...major!

let me put this into perspective. The C.U. I work for has seen over 1/2 a mil in fraud due to the Home Depot hack alone. we only had approxamatly 8000 cards compromised. do the math, over 5 million cards were compromised...



Sorry just had neurosurgery a week ago and I haven't had much of anytime on the internet, I posted before reading up on what had happened with the Home Depot breach. I still don't consider theses things as major damage. They aren't going to collapse businesses. Its a large loss of money and not an insignificant thing in anyway, but in the end it wont lead to any change in the world.


September 30th, 2014, 1:40 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
rao wrote:
regularjoe12 wrote:
rao wrote:
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.



you are kidding me right? I work in the finiancial world. these have done MAJOR damage. You do not want to know how many of your tax dollars are going to insured financial institutions through either the NCUA or FDIC.

Rao... the target and Home Depot breaches have caused MAJOR losses...major!

let me put this into perspective. The C.U. I work for has seen over 1/2 a mil in fraud due to the Home Depot hack alone. we only had approxamatly 8000 cards compromised. do the math, over 5 million cards were compromised...



Sorry just had neurosurgery a week ago and I haven't had much of anytime on the internet, I posted before reading up on what had happened with the Home Depot breach. I still don't consider theses things as major damage. They aren't going to collapse businesses. Its a large loss of money and not an insignificant thing in anyway, but in the end it wont lead to any change in the world.


I hope you are wrong...but you are probably not. :\

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September 30th, 2014, 2:14 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
rao wrote:
regularjoe12 wrote:
rao wrote:
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.
you are kidding me right? I work in the finiancial world. these have done MAJOR damage. You do not want to know how many of your tax dollars are going to insured financial institutions through either the NCUA or FDIC.

Rao... the target and Home Depot breaches have caused MAJOR losses...major!

let me put this into perspective. The C.U. I work for has seen over 1/2 a mil in fraud due to the Home Depot hack alone. we only had approxamatly 8000 cards compromised. do the math, over 5 million cards were compromised...
Sorry just had neurosurgery a week ago and I haven't had much of anytime on the internet, I posted before reading up on what had happened with the Home Depot breach. I still don't consider theses things as major damage. They aren't going to collapse businesses. Its a large loss of money and not an insignificant thing in anyway, but in the end it wont lead to any change in the world.
Rest up and get well.

As for the hacking - I can agree they aren't likely to stop anytime soon, but they can be made more difficult. The fact the Govt can and has tapped into various systems shows how insecure they are. Apple's iOS 8 and Google's next Android version will be encrypted meaning that even they will note have access to the data. The Govt is pi$$ed because they're (Apple & Google) closing the backdoor loopholes Uncle Sam has been using to track and steal data.

Vox.com wrote:
The government says iPhone encryption helps criminals. They're wrong.
Updated by Timothy B. Lee on September 29, 2014, 1:10 p.m. ET tim@vox.com

Last week, FBI director James Comey had sharp words for Apple and its decision to enable encryption by default on iPhones. Comey argued that Apple was allowing its customers to "place themselves beyond the law," and he worried that unbreakable encryption feature will cost lives when law enforcement isn't able to get the information they need to thwart a kidnapping or terrorist attack.

But there are some good reasons for Apple to offer their customers the most robust privacy protections technology allows — even if that means the job of law enforcement becomes a bit more difficult.

The law is on Apple's side
While Comey accused Apple of helping users put themselves beyond the law, it's notable that he didn't say that the products themselves are illegal. That's because they're not: strong encryption products have been legal and widely available for years.

Indeed, the legal status of encryption products was one of the biggest tech policy fights of the 1990s. In the early 1990s, as computers were becoming fast enough to make routine encryption feasible, intelligence and law enforcement agencies were making arguments that sounded a lot like the ones Comey is making now. They wanted backdoors in encryption products to preserve their ability to eavesdrop on people.

But the feds lost that fight, and strong cryptography without backdoors became a foundation of the internet economy. Today, every major web browser comes with strong cryptography built-in. Disk encryption products are available for every major operating system. And email encryption tools are available for free download.

Law enforcement "backdoors" could make iPhones vulnerable to hackers
Comey wants to ensure law enforcement agencies armed with warrants can get access to private samrtphone data. But any system that facilitates access by law enforcement will also make smartphones more vulnerable to hackers too.

As computer scientist Matt Blaze points out, building secure software is a hard enough challenge in its own. Creating a backdoor for the feds adds further complexity, increasing the danger of bugs that will let the bad guys in.

Blaze would know. Two decades ago, the government was pushing the Clipper chip, an encryption device with a built-in backdoor for law enforcement. Then Blaze's research showed that the Clipper chip's backdoor mechanism made the entire encryption scheme insecure. The Clipper chip — and proposals for mandatory backdoors more generally — were scuttled.

Another example of the danger of backdoors came a decade later. The Greek telephone network was built using American hardware that complied with a 1994 law requiring telephone equipment to come with a backdoor mechanism to facilitate spying by law enforcement. In 2004, someone — some have blamed American intelligence agencies — used this system to gain unauthorized access to the Greek telephone network and spy on more than 100 phone lines belonging to senior Greek government officials, including the prime minister.


.....

http://www.vox.com/2014/9/29/6854679/ip ... t-backdoor

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September 30th, 2014, 3:26 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
TheRealWags wrote:
rao wrote:
regularjoe12 wrote:
rao wrote:
Hacks like that wont ever stop. Hackers are like bullets are to body armor. Every time you create a good defense a better offense will be created even quicker. Its a reactive type of job and all can you can do is attempt to close the holes fast enough to minimize damage. The fact that these hackers haven't managed to actually do any significant damage shows whoever is working against them is doing at least an adequate job.
you are kidding me right? I work in the finiancial world. these have done MAJOR damage. You do not want to know how many of your tax dollars are going to insured financial institutions through either the NCUA or FDIC.

Rao... the target and Home Depot breaches have caused MAJOR losses...major!

let me put this into perspective. The C.U. I work for has seen over 1/2 a mil in fraud due to the Home Depot hack alone. we only had approxamatly 8000 cards compromised. do the math, over 5 million cards were compromised...
Sorry just had neurosurgery a week ago and I haven't had much of anytime on the internet, I posted before reading up on what had happened with the Home Depot breach. I still don't consider theses things as major damage. They aren't going to collapse businesses. Its a large loss of money and not an insignificant thing in anyway, but in the end it wont lead to any change in the world.
Rest up and get well.

As for the hacking - I can agree they aren't likely to stop anytime soon, but they can be made more difficult. The fact the Govt can and has tapped into various systems shows how insecure they are. Apple's iOS 8 and Google's next Android version will be encrypted meaning that even they will note have access to the data. The Govt is pi$$ed because they're (Apple & Google) closing the backdoor loopholes Uncle Sam has been using to track and steal data.
[/quote]


Thanks Wags, should be back to normal in a few months.

I totally agree that the these things being hacked can always be better defended, but that responsibility really falls on creators of the OSs and programs being hacked into. The secret service or whoever is responsible on the gov side of things to "defend" against these attacks shouldn't be held accountable for them happening or for trying to stop them since they really can't do that. Their only available action in dealing with these attacks is to shut them down quickly once they happen, seal the backdoor that was found, and try to catch the individuals responsible. The program creators are the only ones that can truly make it harder for the hackers to break in, but its still just a matter of time because the systems are inherently designed to allow people remote access or there would be no need for these systems to be online in the first place.


October 1st, 2014, 8:56 am
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
rao wrote:
I totally agree that the these things being hacked can always be better defended, but that responsibility really falls on creators of the OSs and programs being hacked into. The secret service or whoever is responsible on the gov side of things to "defend" against these attacks shouldn't be held accountable for them happening or for trying to stop them since they really can't do that. Their only available action in dealing with these attacks is to shut them down quickly once they happen, seal the backdoor that was found, and try to catch the individuals responsible. The program creators are the only ones that can truly make it harder for the hackers to break in, but its still just a matter of time because the systems are inherently designed to allow people remote access or there would be no need for these systems to be online in the first place.
Agreed for the most part; I was just trying to show how the Govt is biatching about the OS creators doing what needs to be done to improve their product because it will prevent/make more difficult for the Govt drones to do their jobs (supposedly).

That said, back on the topic the crappy Secret Service....
WaPo wrote:
Armed contractor with criminal record was on elevator with Obama in Atlanta
By Carol D. Leonnig September 30 at 8:43 PM Follow @CarolLeonnig

A security contractor with a gun and three convictions for assault and battery was allowed on an elevator with President Obama during a Sept. 16 trip to Atlanta, violating Secret Service protocols, according to three people familiar with the incident.

Obama was not told about the lapse in his security, these people said. The Secret Service director, Julia Pierson, asked a top agency manager to look into the matter but did not refer it to an investigative unit that was created to review violations of protocol and standards, according to two people familiar with the handling of the case who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The incident, which took place when Obama visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to discuss the U.S. response to the Ebola crisis, rattled Secret Service agents assigned to the president’s protective detail.

The private contractor first aroused the agents’ concerns when he acted oddly and did not comply with their orders to stop using a cellphone camera to record the president in the elevator, according to the people familiar with the incident.

When the elevator opened, Obama left with most of his Secret Service detail. Some agents stayed behind to question the man and then used a national database check that turned up his criminal history.

When a supervisor from the firm providing security at the CDC approached and discovered the agents’ concerns, the contractor was fired on the spot. Then the contractor agreed to turn over his gun — surprising agents, who had not realized that he was armed during his encounter with Obama.

Extensive screening is supposed to keep people with weapons or criminal histories out of arm’s reach of the president. But it appears that this man, possessing a gun, came within inches of the president after undergoing no such screening.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), who heads a House subcommittee that oversees the Secret Service, first heard of the breakdown from a whistleblower. The Washington Post confirmed details of the event with other people familiar with the agency’s review.

“You have a convicted felon within arm’s reach of the president, and they never did a background check,” Chaffetz said. “Words aren’t strong enough for the outrage I feel for the safety of the president and his family. “

Chaffetz added: “His life was in danger. This country would be a different world today if he had pulled out his gun.”

A Secret Service official, speaking on behalf of the agency, said an investigation of the incident is ongoing. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity, citing the pending review.

A White House spokesman declined to comment on the incident or say when, or if, the president had been informed of it.

In response to a question at a combative House hearing Tuesday, Pierson said she briefs the president “100 percent of the time” when his personal security has been breached. However, she said that had happened only one time this year: when Omar Gonzalez jumped over the White House fence Sept. 19 and was able to burst into the mansion.

The revelation of the lapse in Atlanta is the latest in a string of embarrassments for the Secret Service. Some elements of the incident were first reported Tuesday afternoon on the Washington Examiner’s Web site.

Pierson drew criticism Tuesday from lawmakers in both parties during the hearing on her agency’s security lapses. The session focused on the Secret Service’s fumbled responses to the recent White House fence jumper and a 2011 shooting attack on the residence.

The fence breach came three days after Obama’s trip to Atlanta.

The elevator incident exposed a breakdown in Secret Service protocols designed to keep the president safe from strangers when he travels to events outside the White House.

Under a security measure called the Arm’s Reach Program, Secret Service advance staffers run potential event staff members, contractors, hotel employees, invited guests and volunteers through several databases, including a national criminal information registry, and records kept by the CIA, the National Security Agency and the Defense Department, among others. Anyone who is found to have a criminal history, mental illness or other indications of risk is barred from entry.

Local police and federal officers are not checked in the same way under the Arm’s Reach Program, with the Secret Service presuming that they meet the safety standards because of their employment in law enforcement. But private security contractors would typically be checked, said two former agents who worked on advance planning for presidential trips.

For nearly every trip the president takes, at least one person is barred from attending or participating in an event because of problems discovered in his or her background, the two former agents said. Most recently, a local political campaign volunteer who was offering to help drive staffers to and from events during a visit had faced an assault charge in the past.

As part of the Secret Service’s review of the elevator incident, Pierson directed a supervising agent on the president’s protective detail to stay in Atlanta to examine the breakdown.

That decision aroused suspicion on Capitol Hill. Chaffetz said he believes that Pierson was trying to keep another security gaffe quiet at a time when her agency and her leadership are under fire.

Former and current agents say Secret Service leaders prefer this kind of informal internal review for assessing potentially embarrassing mistakes. They say such reviews rarely lead to broad reforms or consequences.

These agents also say it is problematic for a presidential protective detail supervisor to review how his team performed.

In an incident The Post revealed in 2013, a top manager of the president’s protective detail had met a woman while drinking at a bar at the Hay-Adams hotel and had left a bullet from his service weapon in her room after spending the evening with her there. One of his superiors reviewed the incident and at first recommended that he receive a few days of counseling. The Post report about the episode led to the agency launching a fuller investigation.

Julie Tate contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/ ... story.html

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October 1st, 2014, 10:30 am
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
The whole hacker thing seems more and more irrelevant when they seem to muck up one of their most important jobs so bad. Just sad.


October 1st, 2014, 12:31 pm
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Post Re: Secret Service apparently not doing their job
It's a start...
WaPo wrote:
Secret Service chief Julia Pierson resigns

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson on Wednesday accepted the resignation of Secret Service chief Julia Pierson, one day after she went through a grilling on Capitol Hill over her agency’s recent problems with White House security.

Johnson said he appointed Joseph Clancy, a retired former special agent in charge of the Secret Service’s presidential detail, as the agency’s interim director.

He also directed Homeland Security Deputy Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to lead a review of the Sept. 19 White House breach in which a military veteran armed with a knife jumped a fence and made his way all the way to the East Room before being apprehended.

Johnson also announced that an independent review panel “will be named shortly” to examine the breach. He said the group will provide an assessment and recommendations by Dec. 15.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fed ... n-resigns/

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October 1st, 2014, 4:39 pm
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