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 So much for Japanese Quality 
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Post So much for Japanese Quality
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Recalls Fall but Toyota Sees Increase
The Detroit News

By Jeff Plungis and Christine Tierney

Dec. 2, 2005

WASHINGTON ? After a record-breaking year for safety recalls in 2004, the auto industry has improved dramatically in 2005 ? with the notable exception of quality stalwart Toyota Motor Corp., whose recalls more than doubled.

According to data compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Toyota's recalls jumped to 2.2 million through November, compared with 1.1 million for all of 2004.

The recalls at Toyota, the fourth-leading manufacturer in the U. S. market with a reputation for quality-built cars and trucks, stand in sharp contrast to an overall decline in industry recalls.

Following a record 30.8 million vehicles recalled last year, only 16.6 million have been recalled through November. At this point last year, 27.7 million vehicles had been recalled.

The industry is on pace to recall fewer vehicles than in other recent years as well. The average number of annual recalls during the previous 10 years, 1995 through 2004, is 19.3 million vehicles a year.

Toyota's 2005 recalls were driven up by two recalls in particular:

A steering-linkage problem covering 978,000 1989-1995 pickups and 1990-1995 4Runner SUVs

A ball-joint repair for 768,000 4Runner, Tacoma and Sequoia light trucks dating back to 2001.

Toyota officials say the government is more aggressive in requiring companies to report potential safety issues under the TREAD Act, the law Congress passed following the Firestone tire recall. Toyota, like other companies, also has become more proactive about fixing what used to seem like minor problems.

"We're fallible," said Dennis Cuneo, senior vice president of Toyota Motor North America. "We take those opportunities to try to find the root causes, get to it and fix it."

Another factor driving up recalls: An increase in common parts used among different car and light truck models. As a result, a problem part that might in the past have had an impact on a few thousand vehicles can now lead to a recall of more than a million vehicles.

Among Detroit manufacturers, only Ford Motor Co. has seen an increase in recalled vehicles this year, 6 million through Nov. 17, up from 5 million for all of 2004.

General Motors Corp. has recalled 4.1 million vehicles through Nov. 17, down significantly from 10.8 million for 2004. DaimlerChrysler AG has recalled 749,000 vehicles in the United States this year, down from 5.8 million in 2004.

The latest comparable data from trade publication Warranty Week shows that GM's warranty costs worldwide stood at 3.2 percent of automotive sales as of March 31 while Ford's costs were around 2.5 percent. DaimlerChrysler's warranty costs were 5.2 percent, while Toyota's were 1.2 percent, according to Warranty Week, which cautions that the figures might not be entirely comparable because of different accounting systems and currencies.

Toyota is grappling to ensure its big expansion plans do not undercut its reputation for quality. Besides the steering linkage and ball-joint problems affecting trucks and SUVs, Toyota suffered an embarrassing recall of its heralded Prius hybrid in October, when consumers complained that a software glitch could leave them stranded on the road.

Toyota Chief Executive Katsuaki Watanabe and Executive Vice President Yoshimi Inaba stressed recently the company wanted to attack weaknesses, not hide them or ignore them.

In an interview with The Detroit News in January, Inaba said his biggest fear was problems might go undetected that could cause injury or worse to consumers, he said. Japanese automakers have been rattled by Mitsubishi Motors Corp.'s deep troubles stemming from years-long cover-ups of vehicle defects.

Chance Parker, executive director for product research at J.D. Power and Associates, said his firm has not detected any rise in the severity of problems reported by Toyota customers.

"If the customer doesn't actually experience the problem, we don't see much of a relationship between the number of recalls and customer-reported quality," Parker said. "The industry continues to get better every year (on quality), though the number of recalls have generally been increasing."

In a recent report on Toyota, Ron Tadross, auto analyst at Banc of America Securities, noted Toyota's recalls have increased but said money set aside to cover repairs had not risen. "Toyota's warranty accruals per vehicle are $200, or 40 percent below GM and Ford. Although it appears that Toyota has had more recalls, this is attributable to the sheer number of Toyota vehicles on the road."


And just in case you are wondering, the biggest reason why the repair costs for Toyota are less than domestics is because the parts used for repairs aren't manufactured in the U.S. by domestic workers in Union or non-Union facilities. They are made in foreign countries (typically China or Korea) and shipped here with no tariffs care of NAFTA.

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December 2nd, 2005, 2:48 pm
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Post Re: So much for Japanese Quality
m2karateman wrote:
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According to data compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Toyota's recalls jumped to 2.2 million through November, compared with 1.1 million for all of 2004.

Among Detroit manufacturers, only Ford Motor Co. has seen an increase in recalled vehicles this year, 6 million through Nov. 17, up from 5 million for all of 2004.

General Motors Corp. has recalled 4.1 million vehicles through Nov. 17, down significantly from 10.8 million for 2004. DaimlerChrysler AG has recalled 749,000 vehicles in the United States this year, down from 5.8 million in 2004.

OK let's see. Toyota recalls 2.2 million cars, while GM recalls 4.1 million, Ford recalls 6 million, and DC recalls 749,000. To me, that says that the only American auto manufacturer who is making a higher quality vehicle than Toyota is DC. Even though Toyota's recalls increased, they still have far less than GM and Ford. This is one of the big problems with American cars. They are just not reliable. They are getting better, which is good, but until they get to the level of the top foreign manufacturers, people will continue to buy foreign cars. It's that simple. Make a better product, and you will sell more cars.


December 2nd, 2005, 8:26 pm
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Post Re: So much for Japanese Quality
bphelmin wrote:
m2karateman wrote:
Quote:
According to data compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Toyota's recalls jumped to 2.2 million through November, compared with 1.1 million for all of 2004.

Among Detroit manufacturers, only Ford Motor Co. has seen an increase in recalled vehicles this year, 6 million through Nov. 17, up from 5 million for all of 2004.

General Motors Corp. has recalled 4.1 million vehicles through Nov. 17, down significantly from 10.8 million for 2004. DaimlerChrysler AG has recalled 749,000 vehicles in the United States this year, down from 5.8 million in 2004.

OK let's see. Toyota recalls 2.2 million cars, while GM recalls 4.1 million, Ford recalls 6 million, and DC recalls 749,000. To me, that says that the only American auto manufacturer who is making a higher quality vehicle than Toyota is DC. Even though Toyota's recalls increased, they still have far less than GM and Ford. This is one of the big problems with American cars. They are just not reliable. They are getting better, which is good, but until they get to the level of the top foreign manufacturers, people will continue to buy foreign cars. It's that simple. Make a better product, and you will sell more cars.


How many cars do Toyota sell in the US versus the other three? There are other factors that go into all this that many people don't understand. Initial quality surveys by JD Powers show Cadillac to be on par or better than Lexus. How much press does that get? Manufacturing plant quality in North America is heavily skewed to domestic manufacturers being better according to the Harbor Report. How much do you hear about that? There is also surveys which show many domestic models faring better than imports in long term (36 and 60 month) quality studies. Ever hear about those? The fact is, Japanese cars were far better in quality about 10 years ago. Toyota quality is actually below that of Ford and GM in new models. The recalls taking place are not usually on just new models for domestics. It also depends on the type of problem as to how many recalls are actually made. Is it on only certain models with certain options? There's far more to it than simply 'Japanese cars are better'. That's water under the bridge, and untrue in this day and age.

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December 2nd, 2005, 10:40 pm
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All I know is that I will never buy a Japanese car. No offense to anyone who drives one, it just my take on the matter.

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December 3rd, 2005, 3:08 pm
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With all due respect the labels of U.S. or Japanese cars is becoming so blured they are not that different, by that i mean U.S. manufacturers are having alot more parts made in foreign countries and the Japanese companies are having more parts made in the U.S.

If you think U.S. manufactured vehicles from Ford, GM, or others are really made in the U.S., you would be suprised at the number of componants made in foreign countries, in fact it wont be long before U.S. made cars will actually have more foreign parts then U.S. made parts.

Its a sad but true reality...


December 4th, 2005, 5:44 pm
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HunterMSU wrote:
With all due respect the labels of U.S. or Japanese cars is becoming so blured they are not that different, by that i mean U.S. manufacturers are having alot more parts made in foreign countries and the Japanese companies are having more parts made in the U.S.

If you think U.S. manufactured vehicles from Ford, GM, or others are really made in the U.S., you would be suprised at the number of componants made in foreign countries, in fact it wont be long before U.S. made cars will actually have more foreign parts then U.S. made parts.

Its a sad but true reality...


Alllow me to explain something. You hear news about U.S. manufacturers purchasing parts from foreign countries, and that is true. What you don't hear about is the fact that some of those parts are not being used on domestic vehicles, but rather on vehicles being built by domestic car makers in other countries. In 2003, domestic cars were compromised of 87% parts that were either manufactured or assembled in North America. The Japanese car makers were using only about 43% of parts made or assembled in NA. German car makers were worse than that. This is information that can be obtained via the government (Department of Commerce, I think?). 2003 is the last year the information is available for now.

Also, when Japanese car makers build a plant in NA, they use a Japanese realty firm to secure the land, a Japanese development company, Japanese builders, Japanese steel, Japanese equipment and send the profits back to the economy of Japan. Purchasing a Japanese or German vehicle does NOT benefit the economy of the United States. Remember that Ford, GM and Chrysler still give pensions and pay benefits for millions of retirees in the U.S., which helps the economy. How many families in the U.S. does the foreign car makers support. About 1/20th the amount. Not to mention the support industries that American car manufacturing and assembly plants keep in business. Top that off with how many supplier and contract companies depend on the U.S. car manufacturers doing well, and the families they support. I has been estimated that the U.S. automotive industry is either directly or indirectly responsible for the jobs of 1 out of every 6 people in the U.S. That number is declining due to small companies being forced to hire low wage workers, sending work out of NA, or deciding to reduce head count due to lower profits.

GM, Ford and Chrysler were guilty of sitting on their high profit laurels for far too long and not improving quality in their vehicles when they had the chance. That is happening now but the American people, for whatever reason, won't let them forget it. Funny how the American people have forgotten some of the crap that Honda and Toyota was selling in that era as well. Funny how the American people still associate Mercedes as a quality brand, yet they are absolutely terrible with quality surveys done by JD Powers as of late. Americans tend to be harsher on their own domestic brands than on foreign brands. And by doing that, they are shooting their own economy in their collective feet.

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December 4th, 2005, 6:15 pm
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I am all for investing in America as opposed to say dropping 1 trillion in a bottomless pit called Iraq. The trick is to make sure that such investment goes to meritious companies rather than lousy billionare CEOs, marketing whizzes, and inefficient laborers. Education, infrastructure, and research is the way to go. The big three are down for a reason, they made horrible decisions and implemented short sighted policies. It is too bad they will take down so many people and half of Michigan.

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December 5th, 2005, 8:20 pm
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Yorick wrote:
I am all for investing in America as opposed to say dropping 1 trillion in a bottomless pit called Iraq. The trick is to make sure that such investment goes to meritious companies rather than lousy billionare CEOs, marketing whizzes, and inefficient laborers. Education, infrastructure, and research is the way to go. The big three are down for a reason, they made horrible decisions and implemented short sighted policies. It is too bad they will take down so many people and half of Michigan.


Can't/won't argue with you there. It amazes me how American companies pay ridiculous amounts to their executives, yet Japanese companies have a very structured payroll which limits the salary and bonus of the top exec in the company. Nobody deserves a $5 million salary in a company bleeding money. The fact that they still get paid a bonus based on bogus 'measurable performance targets' is beyond me.

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December 5th, 2005, 11:07 pm
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Not to beat a dead horse here, but I saw a report the other day that spoke directly to what we were debating here. Consumer Reports does a reliability survey every year for automobiles. I saw a report on TV that for 2005, of the 31 cars that earned top reliability ratings from Consumer Reports, 29 were from Japanese automakers and only 2 were from US automakers. Likewise, in 2004, 32 cars earned top reliability ratings, and 29 were from Japanese automakers and only 2 were from US automakers.

On the flip side, of the 48 cars that earned the lowest rating, 22 are American, 20 are European, 4 are from Japan, and 2 are from South Korea.

Now, I also recognize that US automakers are rated more highly than ever before in things like initial quality, and I know that GM has a bunch of manufacturing plants that have been rated very highly in terms of quality. But, to me, the most important measure is what the people who actually own the cars have to say. And that is exactly what the Consumer Reports show. They base their analysis on surveys of owners of the cars and statistics of the number of repairs, complaints, etc. for each model. This is where the US automakers run into trouble. If they built a better, more reliable car, owners of the car would not report problems and the cars would require less maintenence. Regardless of what "initial quality" rating they get, or how highly their plants are rated, until they build cars that are more reliable, US automakers are going to lag behind the competition.


December 13th, 2005, 3:15 pm
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This article appeared in the Tri County Times on May 29, 2005

If I Were King
By Foster Childs

Some things never change
There?s a Toyota ad running currently that brags about the fact that they have eight manufacturing plants in the U.S. building more than a million vehicles a year [note: GM had eight manufacturing plants in the United States back in 1911]. The ad then finishes with some patriotic music and the statement ?Toyota-a company that has created over 200,000 U.S. jobs-a company porud to do its small part to add to the landscape of America.?
Pass the barf bag please.
Take just four or five minutes to read this article. Read some actual facts about the U.S. auto industry, not the spin put out by those wiley Japanese.
In terms of quality, of Toyota?s eight plant, their best quality ranking is 16th. Of the top 10 plants for quality, GM has eight of the top 10 and four in the top five.
And then there?s the myth of the happy, teamwork-oriented worker who labors in a unionless paradise surrounded by caring Japanese employers who only have his or her best interest at heart.
Fact: Toyota worker work for less money and are five times more likely than a GM worker to sustain an on-the-job injury and 10 times more likely to be injured seriously enough to lose work days.
Toyota likes to propagate the myth of their commitment to the environment as evidenced by the standard set by the Prius. What you don?t hear about are the scores of Prius owners who are extremely unhappy with the performance and mileage of their Prius. Ads claim 60 mpg-the reality is that many Prius owners get about half that mileage-about 36 mpg. GM has five models that get similar mileage to the Prius and carry no price premium like the Prius-but you never read about that.
If GM had a vehicle that advertised 60 mpg but actually delivered 36 mpg, you can bet that it would be front page news, plus a nice segment on 60 minutes.
But I digress. My point is that there is an incredibly unfair double standard in the media these days. Inexplicably, U.S. bashing has become the fashionable thing to do. There?s no better example than the constant warm fuzzy stories churned out regularly about Toyota?s legendary teamwork, safety and quality. And yet, the facts simply don?t bear this out. The fact is that Toyota gets a free ride from our lazy and complicit media.
But it?s time to separate fact from fiction. Toyota is, and has been, waging a very successful PR war with way too much assistance from our media. This results in a skewed viewpoint that dramatically affects how buyers perceive a new car purchase.
For instance, how many of you know that Chevrolet was the best selling passenger car brand in the U.S. last year?
How many of you are aware that, according to J.D. Power, GM was the number one multi-line manufacturer in Sales Satisfaction last year? Where was Toyota (including Lexus)? Seventh place.
GM was ranked second in the critical customer Service Satisfaction index in multi-line manufacturers last year. Where was Toyota? Fifth place.
GM?s lowest quality rated vehicle is the Pontiac Vibe, assembled in California by - you guessed it - Toyota.
While Toyota is wrapping itself in the American flag with paid advertisements and help from our incompetent media, GM, Ford and Chrysler manufactured over 75 percent of all vehicles built in the U.S. last year. And there average domestic content is 82 percent. Toyota?s is 40 percent (Lexus is 3 percent).
Every 100 GM, Ford or Chrysler vehicles produced in the U.S. supports the livelihood of 23 full-time American workers. Conversely, every point share gained by Toyota (or any other foreign manufacturer) represents 18,000 lost American jobs and countless profit dollars that are shipped overseas to Japan [to strengthen their economy].
I am not suggesting that GM, Ford or Chrysler needs your charity, but I am suggesting you know the facts before you buy.
In the book ?Ghost Soldiers?, the author recounts the story of the Bataan Death March. When the Americans arrived at their destination with over half of them dead due to unspeakable cruelties from their captors, the camp commander stood on a box and shouted ?You Americans are the enemy, you will always be the enemy, one hundred years from now we will still be enemies.?
What has changed since then?
Think about that the next time you go to buy a Toyota.

[i]Submitters footnote: About 1 million people help build, supply and sell GM vehicles alone. Toyota only employs 30,000 people in the entire U.S.

GMs contribution to the GNP of America is four times that of Toyota.

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December 14th, 2005, 4:41 pm
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I'm not arguing the point of whether GM or Toyota contributes more the GNP of this country or employs more people. Frankly I don't care. And yes, I have family members who work for GM and have family who has worked for Ford in the past. My point is that from a quality standpoint, Japanese automakers are still ahead of US automakers. I don't put a whole lot of faith in the quality ratings of a plant when the Consumer Reports ratings for the cars are not good. I always trust what the people who own the cars have to say more than a rating agency.


December 14th, 2005, 7:02 pm
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bphelmin wrote:
I'm not arguing the point of whether GM or Toyota contributes more the GNP of this country or employs more people. Frankly I don't care. And yes, I have family members who work for GM and have family who has worked for Ford in the past. My point is that from a quality standpoint, Japanese automakers are still ahead of US automakers. I don't put a whole lot of faith in the quality ratings of a plant when the Consumer Reports ratings for the cars are not good. I always trust what the people who own the cars have to say more than a rating agency.


Saying you don't care about the contributors to the GNP of this country is a mistake. You may not have anything to do with the auto industry, but I can guarantee you that a domestic automaker going out of business will affect whatever job you are currently in.

You say you want to trust the voice of the customers. That's fine, and it is but one way of judging a vehicle. Keep in mind that the writers working for car magazines do more than just drive the cars. They take them apart, put the cars in more stressful driving situations than the standard consumer does, and often have access to data that the standard consumer does not.

When Toyota or Honda or a foreign car manufacturer has a recall, they don't get the same amount of negative publicity as the domestic car manufacturers. The example in the article I showed gives a prime example of that. As a result, domestic car manufacturers are more highly scrutinized by car buyers. There is a difference between real measurable quality and perceived quality. Quality audits done at the plants and through J.D. Powers use factual data points. Customer surveys are merely opinions and can be easily skewed.

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December 14th, 2005, 7:25 pm
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m2karateman wrote:
Saying you don't care about the contributors to the GNP of this country is a mistake. You may not have anything to do with the auto industry, but I can guarantee you that a domestic automaker going out of business will affect whatever job you are currently in..


Actually it won't. I work for the #1 commercial/industrial property insurance company in the world, and our success or lack thereof really doesn't have anything to do with what happens to the auto industry. We are successful because we're better at assessing risk than anyone else. And the struggles of the US automakers is more a result of poor management than anything else. For example, the agreements with the UAW (high wages, unaffordable penion plans, etc) have crippled the industry. I can't blame an employee for wanting it. But the management has to realize that they can't meet the financial demands and get the unions to realize it as well.

Also, the US automakers always seem to be behind the curve in terms of innovation and market trends. Take the new models of cars being produced. GM has several models of SUV's, but very few small, fuel efficient cars. Meanwhile, gas prices are at very high levels and the demand for smaller cars is rising. I expect that 5 years from now we'll finally see the US automakers start to come out with smaller, more fuel efficient cars. For some reason, the Japanese companies seem to be able to capitalize on changes in the market much more quickly than the US automakers.

m2karateman wrote:
You say you want to trust the voice of the customers. That's fine, and it is but one way of judging a vehicle. Keep in mind that the writers working for car magazines do more than just drive the cars. They take them apart, put the cars in more stressful driving situations than the standard consumer does, and often have access to data that the standard consumer does not.

When Toyota or Honda or a foreign car manufacturer has a recall, they don't get the same amount of negative publicity as the domestic car manufacturers. The example in the article I showed gives a prime example of that. As a result, domestic car manufacturers are more highly scrutinized by car buyers. There is a difference between real measurable quality and perceived quality. Quality audits done at the plants and through J.D. Powers use factual data points. Customer surveys are merely opinions and can be easily skewed.


You're right that there are many ways to judge a vehicle. I guess I don't know how a plant can be rated highly, but the cars being produced by the plant aren't. That's what I mean when I say I don't trust the rating agencies.


December 14th, 2005, 7:55 pm
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bphelmin wrote:
Actually it won't. I work for the #1 commercial/industrial property insurance company in the world, and our success or lack thereof really doesn't have anything to do with what happens to the auto industry. We are successful because we're better at assessing risk than anyone else. And the struggles of the US automakers is more a result of poor management than anything else. For example, the agreements with the UAW (high wages, unaffordable penion plans, etc) have crippled the industry. I can't blame an employee for wanting it. But the management has to realize that they can't meet the financial demands and get the unions to realize it as well.


I never meant that you wouldn't be successful, or your company, but you would be affected by a domestic car manufacturer going out of business. It would have more far reaching affects than you may realize. Of course, the Detroit area would be most adversely affected, but dealerships going out of business, car plants, suppliers dependent on that company, etc. would effect the economy of the entire nation. That is what I was alluding to.

bphelmin wrote:
Also, the US automakers always seem to be behind the curve in terms of innovation and market trends. Take the new models of cars being produced. GM has several models of SUV's, but very few small, fuel efficient cars. Meanwhile, gas prices are at very high levels and the demand for smaller cars is rising. I expect that 5 years from now we'll finally see the US automakers start to come out with smaller, more fuel efficient cars. For some reason, the Japanese companies seem to be able to capitalize on changes in the market much more quickly than the US automakers.


Did you realize that GM has the most models of any car manufacturer that are rated at 30 mph or greater? Yet you say they don't have enough. This is what I mean by perceived images rather than factual. GM has a greater amount of SUVs because that is what the market was dictating less than a year ago. It is IMPOSSIBLE for any car manufacturer to modify their vehicle profile in that short of time. I haven't seen any other manufacturers discontinue building large SUVs. Years ago, when the trend to go to SUVs was ramping up, people complained that GM had too many cars and not enough trucks. Well, new vehicles aren't developed overnight. Trends change must faster than is possible for most car manufacturers to keep up with. Right now American car manufacturers have as many or more compact cars in their individual portfolios than Japanese car makers. Chevy Aveo? Ford Focus? Pontiac Vibe? Japanese car manufacturers have made their cars larger and larger with less and less fuel economy over the course of the past ten years. Why aren't you criticizing them? Yet, during that time the domestic car manufacturers have increased the average fuel economy of their vehicle portfolios and yet you are saying they aren't doing enough or not doing it fast enough. I agree that car manufacturers in America don't respond as quickly as they should to market trends. That involves what you spoke of to the mis-management that takes place here. I couldn't agree more. And that is the problem, the red tape and bureaucracy kills development time and vehicle launches more than you can imagine. The Japanese management structure is much better and much more defined. It's not that they make better decisions, but that their decisions can come to fruition much faster.

bphelmin wrote:
You're right that there are many ways to judge a vehicle. I guess I don't know how a plant can be rated highly, but the cars being produced by the plant aren't. That's what I mean when I say I don't trust the rating agencies.


By saying that a plant is highly rated, it measures several things. Among these are their rate of injury, lost time, down time due to problems along the line, repair time for vehicles, productivity rates, and machine change and repair capability. All the things measured show how well a plant operates from both a productivity standpoint as well as a quality standpoint. Things like torques on fasteners are measured to ensure that the specifications are being met, fit and finish of body panels, paint quality, suspension specifications, etc. are all inspected and measured.
Typically when these things are done well the first time it increases productivity and overall quality of the vehicle build.

But there are complaints made by customers that are the fault of the customer and not the vehicle. I'll give you an example. The new Cadillac STS is NOT supposed to ride like a Fleetwood Brougham D'Elegance. The old Fleetwoods were built to ride like you were riding on a cloud, and the suspensions were tuned as such. They weren't nimble, they weren't quick and they didn't give much road response. But Cadillac buyers are typically beyond middle aged, and they have come to expect cushioned rides in their Cadillacs. Our dealers, in an effort to make a sale, don't share the fact that the new STS is a performance vehicle and the new gray hair takes the car home only to bring it back and complain that the cars ride is too harsh. Some have adaptable ride suspension, have it set on 'Sport' and don't realize it until they've brought it back. However, these customers when surveyed will give negative responses about the car when, in fact, it was their fault and the car was well built.

I am not saying that the domestic car manufacturers don't have some ground to make up. But the rate of quality improvement of domestic car makers over the past five years is much higher than that of the Japanese car makers. Lexus is a premium car manufacturer from a quality standpoint. But if you take their numbers out of the Toyota overall quality numbers, the Toyota brand vehicles aren't all that great from a quality standpoint. But customer surveys, based on opinion, give them higher marks because of what they perceive, not because of what they see.

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December 14th, 2005, 10:30 pm
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I never meant that you wouldn't be successful, or your company, but you would be affected by a domestic car manufacturer going out of business. It would have more far reaching affects than you may realize.


That is very true. Hardly anyone would be unaffected, the auto industry is connected to so many industries. For example, my dad sells pumps to Delphi for a small business which almost went under when Delphi declared bankruptcy because they owed the company so much money. We are just one little company who sells to a supplier. The chain reactions of Ford or GM declaring bankruptcy would be gigantic.

Just my little contribution.

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December 14th, 2005, 10:52 pm
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