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 Next up: Minnesota Vikings 
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Post Next up: Minnesota Vikings
PFT wrote:
Mike Zimmer: Teddy Bridgewater’s “fine”
Posted by Josh Alper on October 7, 2014, 3:18 PM EDT

Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said after last Thursday’s loss to the Packers that the team expected to have quarterback Teddy Bridgewater back in the starting lineup and Tuesday brought no reason to think that plan has changed.

Bridgewater took part in the team’s practice and various media members reported that he showed no signs of ongoing issues with the ankle injury that kept him out against Green Bay. After the practice concluded, Zimmer said the team wouldn’t be talking about injuries although he did say that the quarterback was “fine” before moving on to other topics.

Zimmer’s desire to wait for Wednesday meant there wasn’t any update about safety Harrison Smith’s ankle. Smith was injured Thursday’s game and didn’t take part in the portion of practice open to the media, although the injury didn’t stop him from making it through the Packers game.

Wide receiver Jarius Wright also missed practice, but Zimmer said it was a personal matter and not injury related.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... ters-fine/

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October 8th, 2014, 9:17 am
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Looks like Harrison Smith will play so we should definetely sit Calvin so he isn't murdered by him. Seriously, I don't think anyone abuses CJ like Harrison Smith.

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October 8th, 2014, 10:19 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
More on Teddy:
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Teddy Bridgewater: I’ll be full speed on Sunday
Posted by Josh Alper on October 8, 2014, 4:53 PM EDT

The Vikings aren’t bothering to be coy about the fact that quarterback Teddy Bridgewater will be back in the starting lineup against the Lions this week.

Coach Mike Zimmer said Tuesday that Bridgewater’s ankle is “fine” and Bridgewater sent the same message on Wednesday. He said he felt like he could have played last Thursday and that he will be playing without any physical restrictions once game time rolls around.

“I’ve been able to spend a bunch of time in the training room since we got back from Green Bay, so the ankle is feeling good and I’m excited to get back out there for this weekend,” Bridgewater said, via the Minneapolis Star Tribune. “On Sunday I’ll be able to just play full speed.”

Bridgewater’s absence against the Packers after he beat the Falcons in his first NFL start took a lot of the wind out of the team’s sails, so having him back at full speed should bring a lot of things getting back up to full speed as well.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/20 ... on-sunday/
For once I'd like to see the Defense rattle a rookie QB...is that too much to ask?

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October 9th, 2014, 9:30 am
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
ESPN wrote:
Lions vs. Vikings preview
October, 9, 2014
By Ben Goessling and Michael Rothstein | ESPN.com

Since 1997, the Minnesota Vikings have lost one home game against the Detroit Lions. But the Vikings are playing in a new stadium this year, and the Lions might have evolved into a new type of challenge for the Vikings.

The Lions have allowed the fewest yards and the second-fewest points in the league this season, giving up just 372 rushing yards so far and holding all but one opponent this season under 20 points. The Vikings, meanwhile, are trying to recover from a 42-10 loss last week to the Green Bay Packers, though they should have rookie Teddy Bridgewater back at quarterback after a disastrous spot start from Christian Ponder.

If the Vikings are able to beat the Lions at TCF Bank Stadium on Sunday, though, they'll be tied with Detroit at 3-3, and no worse than a game behind the Packers in the NFC North. Neither team has another division game before November, and both will be looking to land an important victory on Sunday.

ESPN.com Vikings reporter Ben Goessling and ESPN.com Lions reporter Michael Rothstein break down this week's matchup:

Ben Goessling: Michael, the Vikings are coming off a game in which they didn’t get much pressure on Aaron Rodgers. Both Mike Zimmer and Brian Robison said too many defenders were trying to win one-on-one matchups, instead of staying committed to the defensive scheme. And now the Vikings face a team that’s allowed 17 sacks this season. Why have the Lions had so much trouble protecting Matthew Stafford, and how do you anticipate that will affect Sunday’s game?

Michael Rothstein: It’s interesting because other than Detroit’s disastrous kicking problems, the offensive line’s inability to protect Stafford has been the Lions’ biggest issue this season. Initially, it looked like the injury to right tackle LaAdrian Waddle was the issue as Detroit rotated Garrett Reynolds and Cornelius Lucas at the position. But Waddle returned against Buffalo and the Lions allowed six sacks anyway. The issue appears to be multifaceted. Right guard Larry Warford explained part of the issue comes with the fact that it takes longer for routes to develop, so the pocket has to stay intact longer. It is more complex, however, because the past two weeks the line has struggled with various twists and stunts from the Jets and Bills. It hasn’t picked them up well, leading to collapsed pockets.

Meanwhile, the Vikings' offense has appeared as a rotation of characters without definition due to injury and suspension. The Lions have the toughest defense in the league and are in the top five against the run and the pass. Do you think there is enough offensive stability with the Vikings to move the ball, Ben?

Goessling: Yes, but it depends on how effectively the Vikings’ offensive line can protect Bridgewater. The rookie will be returning from a sprained ankle. While he was able to throw effectively against the Atlanta Falcons, he also had good pass protection for much of the day against a team that hasn’t been terribly effective at getting to the quarterback. That won’t be the case on Sunday, and it will be incumbent upon the Vikings’ offensive line -- particularly left tackle Matt Kalil, who has had a difficult third season -- to keep Bridgewater upright. He’s done a good job of extending plays and breaking out of the pocket, and the Vikings will run enough read-option stuff that the Lions might have to take the edge off their pass rush from time to time. If all that happens, Bridgewater can find his receivers and make some plays in the running game. But it starts with the Vikings’ offensive line standing up to a tall task.

If the Lions don’t have Calvin Johnson this weekend, how will their offense function, with Reggie Bush and Joique Bell both returning from injuries?

Rothstein: In years past, this would be a major concern as the Lions were stagnant without Johnson in 2013 -- Minnesota fans might remember that from last season's finale. This season is a little bit different because of Golden Tate. He came to the Lions in the offseason as a No. 2 option and has played almost like a No. 1 receiver. He’s fifth in the league in yards (451), tied for seventh in receptions (31) and leads the NFL in yards after catch with 237. He’s been a difference-maker for Detroit when the rest of the Lions have been banged up. He had a massive game with Bell out of the lineup and both Johnson and Bush beaten up last week against Buffalo, gaining 134 yards.

Of course, this time around the Vikings might be planning for a Johnson-less Lions, which would shift the focus to Tate even more. That could be a concern for Detroit because the wide receiver depth beyond the top two is not good. Corey Fuller has very little experience. Jeremy Ross is the team’s primary return guy. Ryan Broyles has some experience, but is clearly the No. 5 receiver. The Lions could expand the tight end roles, but they have only two of them in Brandon Pettigrew and Eric Ebron as Joseph Fauria recovers from his ankle injury. And as you mentioned, the running game is in question with both Bush and Bell coming back from injuries.

All this is to say it really depends on who gets back and how healthy they are. The one thing Joe Lombardi’s offense has shown so far is its flexibility based on injuries and personnel. As long as they have bodies, they’ll find ways to use them. But an offense without Johnson and Bush? It could take a little getting used to for Stafford.

You mentioned Bridgewater. Is he the potential answer to win in the short-term (both Sunday and this season) for Minnesota or is he still the long-term guy? For a rookie his numbers have been pretty good. Or is that just smoke and mirrors because of the defenses he has faced?

Goessling: In the short term, if the Vikings are going to win, it almost has to be because of Bridgewater. They’re certainly not deep enough, especially without Adrian Peterson, to win in spite of him, like they did with Ponder at times in 2012. I’ve been impressed with him when he’s played. He’s got better pocket presence than most rookies, he’s quick to diagnose defenses and make the right reads, and he’s been able to make plays with his feet. All the things people liked about him coming out of college have carried over to the NFL so far. He doesn’t have the biggest arm in the world, and it remains to be seen how much that will affect his development going forward, but he’s smart enough and athletic enough that he can be a good quarterback in the future. Whether he’ll have enough to be great, we’ll see. But he’s got more poise and polish than you’ll see from many quarterbacks his age.

The Lions have always defended the run well, but now they might have the best pass defense the Vikings have seen so far this season. What’s changed with them this year -- is it the new coaching staff getting more out of some of the players who have been there for a few years?

Rothstein: It might be the most difficult thing to explain on this entire roster. In theory, with this roster, the Lions should be giving up passing yards no matter who is the opponent. Entering the season, Darius Slay was coming off an inconsistent rookie season, Rashean Mathis was fighting Father Time, James Ihedigbo was injured and the Lions had a bunch of question marks in the slot with no proven depth. Then Detroit lost its top two slot corners in the first two weeks when Bill Bentley and Nevin Lawson had season-ending injuries. Ihedigbo missed three weeks with a neck injury. Yet no matter who the Lions put in the secondary, they've been effective. Slay has turned into one of the better young corners in the NFC. Mathis is having another consistent season. Glover Quin and Ihedigbo have become the tandem Detroit hoped for. And unheralded players like Isa Abdul-Quddus and Danny Gorrer have been surprises.

This secondary should be getting shredded, but it has turned in good performance after good performance no matter who is back there. The defensive pressure up front helps, but that has been the biggest surprise on the roster this season.

Since we’re talking defense, the Vikings are statistically mediocre on defense. Is that more of a product of who they’ve played the past four weeks -- Tom Brady, Drew Brees, Matt Ryan and Aaron Rodgers -- or are they basically a middle-of-the-road group?

Goessling: More than anything, I'd describe it as a work in progress. They have the potential to be really good in the future, probably after they have another offseason to get the pieces Mike Zimmer needs to make his scheme work. Occasionally, you see glimpses of a defense that has plenty going for it already -- the Vikings have been able to make in-game adjustments and keep the quarterbacks they've played from throwing all over them. Really, the games they've lost to Brady, Brees and Rodgers have had more to do with their run defense than their pass defense, which is a significant change for anybody who's watched the Vikings. Safety Harrison Smith is turning into a star, cornerback Xavier Rhodes shows signs of developing into a solid cover man and rookie linebacker Anthony Barr will move all over Zimmer's defense. But the Vikings need to get a more consistent pass rush, especially with their front four, and they've been beaten up in the run game too much this year. Those things will have to change if they're going to become the kind of defense Zimmer wants.

http://espn.go.com/blog/minnesota-vikin ... gs-preview

Quote:
Lions at Vikings: Stats of the Week
27
Times Matthew Stafford has been sacked in eight games against the Vikings in his career, including five times last season.

30.9
Percentage of dropbacks in which Vikings quarterbacks have been pressured this season. That's the sixth-highest total in the league, and this week, the Vikings face the team with the league's second-highest sack total.


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October 9th, 2014, 9:39 am
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
from their perspective... Go to link at bottom to see with tables.

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Matchup Index: Detroit Lions

This week we'll once again look for statistical trends and matchup advantages that the Vikings could potentially take advantage of in their clash this Sunday with the Detroit Lions. Since there appeared to be some overall disdain and general consternation over the use of Pro Football Focus player grades last week, this time around I'll be utilizing multiple resources in trying to decide which matchups the Vikings could potentially exploit. What follows is something of a "Matchup Index" if you will.

Starting with the Lions offense versus the Vikings defense, there are a few general trends of which to make note. Overall, the Lions offense has generated an average of 343.2 total offensive yards per game through the first 5 games of the year, good enough to rank tied for 19th best with the Titans. This is just an average showing in overall yardage output, and unfortunately for the Lions they only average 19.8 points per game, one spot worse than the Vikings. Some of this could probably be explained by the fact that Calvin Johnson has not been playing 100% healthy for the past few games and he has historically accounted for a large share of their offensive production. But despite the low scoring recently, the Lions are still very good on 3rd down, converting 46% of their 3rd down attempts, ranked tied for 9th.

Looking a little deeper at their offensive ranks shows that they are a much better passing offense than rushing offense. While Matthew Stafford hasn't been a particularly efficient quarterback this year (89.1 passer rating, ranked 27th overall and only 6 passing TDs to 4 INT) he has managed to accumulate a lot of passing yards per game: 279.4 (ranked 10th best) thanks to their willingness to commit to the pass (179 attempts through 5 games, 7th most). When everyone was healthy in week 1, the Lions offense totally steamrolled the Giants with a final score of 35-14, but they haven't been able to maintain that level of health the past few weeks, which could partly explain the low overall numbers for Stafford. But it could also be the offensive line, which according to Football Outsiders has an adjusted sack rate of 8.4% (ranked 29th). Pro Football Focus ranks the Detroit offensive line 19th best in "pass blocking efficiency" which takes into account sacks allowed, hits allowed and QB hurries as a total measure of "pressure allowed" divided by their total number of pass plays. So, perhaps a combination of sub-par pass blocking combined with injuries to the skill positions could explain the lack of points and efficiency in the Detroit passing offense.

The Lions rushing attack has slipped from a middle-of-the-pack yards per game ranking last year, to a bottom of the pack ranking in 2014. Last year they averaged 112 rushing yards per game, with Reggie Bush running wild for much of the season en route to the 2nd most rushing yards of his career. This year however, the Lions have only managed an average of 83.6 yards per game through the first 5 weeks, ranked 28th overall. And it's not because they have been running the ball infrequently; they run an average of 26.6 times per game (tied for 17th most). It's that they are not effective as a rushing offense, because their yards per carry mark is terrible: only 3.1 rushing yards per attempt, ranked 2nd worst in the league. Again, this is probably an issue of the offensive line. Football Outsiders has the Detroit offensive line ranked 22nd overall in "Adjusted Line Yards" which attempts to account for the number of rushing yards the line generates independent of the running back. Similarly, Pro Football Focus ranks Detroit's overall "Run Blocking" 20th best.

So, generally speaking the Lions offense has tended to throw the ball a lot, and has generated a lot of passing yards with a high 3rd down conversion rate. But their rushing attack has not been effective, and they haven't managed to put up a lot of points on the board outside of a week 1 blowout win against the Giants. Most of their issues appear to stem from the offensive's line inability to block: both in passing and rushing.

The Matchup Indices below will compare the blocking grades of each individual Detroit offensive lineman against each of our defensive lineman's blocking grades. This should allow us to see where there might be some potential for matchup exploitations in the trenches. Last week I highlighted Shariff Floyd against the Packer's right side of the O-line as a possible point of exploitation. Sure enough, Floyd notched one of our two sacks last week, and also got a QB hit as well en route to the highest graded pass rushing effort on the team in the game from Pro Football Focus. So, let's see if there are any decent matchups this week.

Granted, it's difficult to extrapolate much from the Pro Football grades, other than to say that over the course of the first 5 games of the year the Vikings defensive line has been generally graded poorly as pass rushers on an individual standpoint, and the Lions have been graded sort of mixed on an individual standpoint. But the sack rates and pass rushing efficiency numbers I pointed to above point out that the Lions don't really excel as pass blockers when taken together as a whole line. Aside from Larry Warford, and to some extent Riley Reiff, the Lions offensive lineman are not standout pass blockers. And Rob Sims appears to be a real liability in pass blocking. Unfortunately for the Vikings, there aren't too many stand-out pass rushers on the defensive line to take advantage of the Detroit weaknesses. In fact, Football Outsiders has the Vikings defensive line ranked 13th in adjusted sack rate (6.3%) and Pro Football Focus has the Vikings ranked 24th overall in pass rushing.

I think it's important to note at this point that backup tackles Tom Johnson and Shamar Stephen are not included in the table above for the Vikings. While they have received about a third of the defensive snaps, Tom Johnson has been the most effective pass rushing defensive tackle on the team, garnering a +2.0 pass rushing grade and the most sacks (2) of any tackle on the team. Never-the-less Linval Joseph could be in line for a good game lining up over the top of Sims and Raola, both of whom are average or worse in pass blocking. Joseph has the most total pressures of any defensive lineman (11 hits, hurries and sacks), with the 7th best "pressure percentage" of all defensive tackles in the league. His -0.4 grade suggests he is slightly below average as a pass rusher, but his high "pressure percentage" says otherwise. I like his matchup this week especially. Although on the whole, I can see our front four finding it difficult to apply pressure to Matthew Stafford without some blitzing help.

There are some encouraging matchups in the run game. The Detroit line looks generally poor in run blocking, and our defensive ends excel in securing the edges. However, Detroit's veteran center Dominic Raola grades out very well as a run blocker and will be facing our lowest graded run defender in Linval Joseph (which is kind of surprising given that he's the nose tackle). I believe the Vikings defensive line will have a real advantage against their run game as not only do the player grades suggest this, the overall team statistics suggest it as well. The Vikings run defense has allowed an average of 121.8 yards per game (19th best) and 4.3 yards per carry (17th best), which puts them in the middle of the pack. Football Outsiders ranks our run blocking "adjusted line yards" 29th best, while Pro Football Focus ranks our overall run defense 14th best. This is certainly a mixed review of our run defense, but as I pointed out above, the Lions have a dreadful rushing attack. Hopefully we'll be able to take advantage of their generally weak offensive line in the running game. If the Lions want to try to pound the ball through the center of our defense, they should find it much easier sledding though, especially considering that middle linebacker Jasper Brinkley merely has a +0.8 grade in run defense to support Linval Joseph (not bad, but not particularly good either). Reggie Bush is "day to day" after spraining his ankle last week, and if he misses the game Sunday that can only bode well for the Vikings defense's chances of stopping the run.

In looking at the skill positions, it's a much more difficult comparison as wide receivers and tight ends can lineup all over the field and against a variety of defensive backs and linebackers. The "Matchup Index" won't prove quite as useful as it would for lineman. But we'll break it down anyway. In this case, I've chosen to look at the Detroit wide receivers "receiving" grades against the Vikings defensive backs "pass coverage" grades.

Overall, based on the Pro Football Focus grades, the Lions appear to have a slight advantage with two green graded players and only one red, to the Vikings one green player and two reds. If Calvin Johnson misses time though, that would elevate Ryan Broyles to their #4 spot. Broyles has been a healthy scratch several times and has only played 11 snaps all year with a +0.2 (aka, league average) grade. That would still give the Lions a slight edge, but would certainly level playing field a bit. One interesting thing to note about these grades is that Pro Football Focus has Golden Tate graded higher than Calvin Johnson. This is probably due to Johnson trying to play through his injury and largely being used as a decoy the past few games. But Football Outsiders also likes Tate more than Johnson in their DYAR (Defensive Yards Above Replacement) rankings. In fact, Golden Tate is their 5th ranked wide receiver through the first 5 weeks, while Calvin Johnson is 11th. Not only that, but Golden Tate is averaging over 90 receiving yards per game (7th most) with a 14.5 yards per catch average. Johnson is only averaging just under 70 yards per game (ranked 20th). Corey Fuller and Jeremy Ross are replacement level players at this point with Fuller over-taking Broyles on the depth chart as a rookie. In short, if Calvin Johnson is healthy and plays, I expect him and Tate to be able to do some damage to our secondary. But if he sits, then I think it significantly levels the playing field. In addition Pro Football Focus ranks the Lions passing offense 11th best, while Football Outsiders ranks them 16th best. Football Outsiders ranks the Vikings pass defense 24th while Pro Football Focus ranks them 25th in pass rushing (as a team) and 20th in pass coverage (as a team).

After taking a look at the matchups and trends for the Lions offense against our defense, I can say that a lot of it is going to ride on the health and effectiveness of Calvin Johnson and Reggie Bush. If both are out, I expect the advantage to swing pretty heavily in favor of the Vikings. The Lions should find it difficult to get much established on the ground even with Bush healthy, although Stafford will likely have all day in the pocket. That said, if Megatron sits that could allow us to send extra pass rushers in to pressure Stafford and leave the likes of Jeremy Ross and Corey Fuller in single coverage without too much worry. But the Lions have a good passing attack, and our defense hasn't figured out a good way to counter opposing passing offenses which could spell trouble especially if Calving Johnson is healthy enough to play.

On the flipside of the coin, how do the matchups look for the Vikings offense against a much improved Detroit defense? Well, the Vikings offense overall has looked pretty inconsistent thanks in large part to having to start three different quarterbacks through the first five weeks. We are generating only 335.2 total offensive yards per game (ranked 23rd best), slightly worse than the Lions. We are ranked 25th in 3rd down conversion percentage (36%) and only 26th in points per game (20.2). Unfortunately, the Lions defense is ranked #1 in total yards allowed (allowing an average of only 282.4 yards per game). They are also second best in points allowed, with an average of only 15.8 per game. They have the 5th best passing defense, allowing an average of 208 passing yards per game, and the 4th best run defense allowing an average of only 74.4 rushing yards per game.

In looking at the Vikings offense in more detail, our 27th ranked passing offense is a serious hindrance as our quarterbacks have only managed an average of 205.2 passing yards per game, despite attempting the 17th most passes (165 total). Our "Voltron-esque" quarterbacks have managed a combined passer rating of 68.6, 2nd worst in the league (thanks Cassel and Ponder) with only three passing touchdowns against SIX interceptions. Teddy Bridgewater was our most efficient quarterback so far accounting for nearly 1/3 of all of our passing yards in one start. With Teddy back in the fold this week, our passing attack should rebound.

Despite having Peterson on the field for only one game, our rushing attack is not nearly as inept as our passing game though. We are ranked 10th in rushing yards per game with 130, although we also have the 10th most rushing attempts in the league. Still, our yards per carry average has improved recently climbing up to 4.6 (also ranked 10th). The Vikings are getting Jerick Mckinnon more involved as well they should, because his 5.5 yards per carry average dwarfs Matt Asiata's 3.7 yards per carry average. It's a small sample size to be sure, but Mckinnon's explosive potential, as evidenced by his 55-yard scamper against the Falcons (longest run by a Vikings running back this year) makes him a logical player to see an increased role.

All that said the matchup indices below paint a pretty bleak picture for the Vikings offense. We'll start in the trenches as I did above as we'll compare the passing game first, and the run game second.

As you can see based on the individual grades, things don't look good for the Vikings offensive line when it comes to pass blocking against the Lions. Football Outsiders ranks the Vikings 31st in adjusted sack rating (9.0%), while Pro Football Focus ranks them 29th in pass blocking efficiency. Just about any way you slice it, the offensive line looks poor. And try not to notice that Nadamukong Suh gets to face our backup right guard in Ducasse. Unfortunately for us, Brandon Fusco was our highest rated pass blocker before he landed on injured reserve. Not only are the Lions two defensive tackles highly graded, but Suh has the 5th best "pressure percentage" of all defensive tackles in the NFL, and Fairley has the 7th best. I see nothing but disadvantages for the Vikings in the trenches in our passing game.

Just like with pass blocking, our offensive line looks completely overmatched in the running game. The Vikings sport the 21st best offensive line in "Adjusted Line Yards" according to Football Outsiders. Conversely, the Lions have the 2nd best defensive line in "Adjusted Line Yards" allowed. As pointed out above, the Lions are 4th best at stopping the run allowing an average of only 74 yards on the ground. In short, the Vikings could find it difficult to get much of anything going on the ground this Sunday.

Things don't exactly get much better when considering the skill positions. The Vikings offensive line looks like it will be over-matched in all aspects against Detroit, but unfortunately the wide receivers have a tough road ahead of them as well. As before, I've included the Vikings receiving grades to compare against the Lions pass coverage grades.

Folks, this is not your friendly Detroit Lions secondary anymore. They have completely revamped their secondary with free agents and draft picks with all four members of the secondary grading positively "in the green" in pass coverage. Sad to say, but not one Vikings receiver grades in the positive through the first 5 games. This matchup looks dreadful on paper. It's not just Pro Football Focus that is down on our receivers, Football Outsiders ranks Greg Jennings as the best receiver, which isn't saying much as he's ranked 27th overall in their DYAR metric. Patterson is ranked 32nd and Jarius Wright is ranked 51st in the same metric while Adam Thielen doesn't qualify. Jennings leads all Vikings receivers in catches and yards (17 receptions for 235 yards and a TD), but don't get too excited. Jennings is ranked only 54th overall in receiving yards in the NFL so far. I can't help but put much of the blame for the lack of production at receiver on the quarterback and offensive line. But the Vikings receivers are at least partly to blame with less than desirable catch rates with Jennings clocking in at 61%, Patterson at 60% and Wright at 58%.

All signs point to the Vikings offense struggling against the Detroit defense. Teddy Bridgewater will certainly have his work cut out for him and I will not be at all surprised to see him struggle with a fierce pass rush and receivers that can't get open (or that simply drop catchable balls). The Vikings running backs will also find it difficult to find daylight. The Vikings will want to employ screen passes to neutralize the Detroit pass rush, and try to get their running backs out on the edges to attack their defensive ends and linebackers.

I'm not going to offer up a scoring prediction, but I would not be surprised to see the Lions pull off a win, even if Calvin Johnson misses the game.


http://www.dailynorseman.com/2014/10/8/ ... roit-lions

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October 9th, 2014, 1:10 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Pretty good write up, though they didn't mention anything about the TEs. I would think our TEs match up well vs their LBs; wouldn't be at all surprised to see a good game from Ebron.

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October 9th, 2014, 2:16 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Am I the only one who finds the new announcers extremely annoying? It's hard enough listening to Goldberg on UFC, who in seven hells thought it would be a good idea to put him on football?


October 12th, 2014, 2:08 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Worst announcers ever, no idea who plays for what team or how to even call a play. When did Mike Goldberg transition from MMA to announcing for NFL?


October 12th, 2014, 2:36 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
munch107 wrote:
Worst announcers ever, no idea who plays for what team or how to even call a play. When did Mike Goldberg transition from MMA to announcing for NFL?


I wouldn't be surprised if these bums were last minute replacements to the real announcers, who might have missed their flight or something.


October 12th, 2014, 2:44 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Lol yeah, i heard them callt he wrong player (from the other team) 3-4 times today. It was atrocious.


October 12th, 2014, 4:21 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
DayDreamer wrote:
Am I the only one who finds the new announcers extremely annoying? It's hard enough listening to Goldberg on UFC, who in seven hells thought it would be a good idea to put him on football?

I didn't watch the game until the last half. Bill Goldberg did play college football, and I think was in the NFL for a brief time, if only on a practice squad. But I listened to the first half of the game on the radio, and Jim Brandstatter was making mistake after mistake as well. Must be something in the air.

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October 12th, 2014, 7:09 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
Brendan Ayanbedajo (former LB and special teamer) was the other announcer. He screwed up which player was on which team a ton.


October 12th, 2014, 7:51 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
munch107 wrote:
Worst announcers ever, no idea who plays for what team or how to even call a play. When did Mike Goldberg transition from MMA to announcing for NFL?


i agree, worst play was the triple penalty fumbled punt return play which the lions recovered before the penalties offset and the play was re-played. they didnt even notice there was a fumble, too busy counting the flags while the play was ongoing...


October 12th, 2014, 8:20 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
m2karateman wrote:
I didn't watch the game until the last half. Bill Goldberg did play college football, and I think was in the NFL for a brief time, if only on a practice squad. But I listened to the first half of the game on the radio, and Jim Brandstatter was making mistake after mistake as well. Must be something in the air.


m2k, it wasn't Bill Goldberg, it was Mike "I can't say a thing right so I elongate everything" Goldberg. I wish it were Bill, he at least has some football background and would've been funny. Between Mike and Ayanbadajo, they were wrong at least 50% of the time. They got the route names wrong, players' names wrong (even when the back of the jersey was facing the camera), yardage wrong... Seriously, if they wanted to try out a rookie on play by play, they should have at least given him a better number 2.

Apparently, we're not alone in marveling at his suckitute:
http://fansided.com/2014/10/12/ufcs-mike-goldberg-struggling-nfl-commentator-debut/


October 12th, 2014, 8:52 pm
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Post Re: Next up: Minnesota Vikings
The Legend wrote:
munch107 wrote:
Worst announcers ever, no idea who plays for what team or how to even call a play. When did Mike Goldberg transition from MMA to announcing for NFL?


i agree, worst play was the triple penalty fumbled punt return play which the lions recovered before the penalties offset and the play was re-played. they didnt even notice there was a fumble, too busy counting the flags while the play was ongoing...


I was driving during the game yesterday. So I had to listen on XM. Which means I was forced to listen to the Vikings radio crew. On that play, one of those idiots admitted that he couldn't tell what any of the flags were for. And the he suggested that the refs should have different colored flags for different penalties.

I can just see refs pulling flags out of their sleeves like a circus clown until they find the right color. LOL.


October 13th, 2014, 12:31 pm
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