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 Did you know? Charles Rogers dilutted urine 
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Post Did you know? Charles Rogers dilutted urine
Star WR Rogers, Cox both had diluted urine



April 14 2003
It's a letter no NFL player or prospect wants to receive: A positive urine test. But in the case of Michigan State receiver Charles Rogers, a consensus top-three pick in this year's draft, the positive test administered at the scouting combine in Indianapolis was labeled as "diluted urine" and not for any specific banned substance.

Rogers, through his agent Kevin Poston, claims that the diluted urine was nothing more than excessive water based on the amount Rogers was encouraged to consume by doctors after he was having trouble producing a urine sample that day in February.

? This is ridiculous. I guess it means I'm representing a water abuser." ?
? Peter Schaffer
Agent for Torrie Cox

"He had to go to the bathroom for them at 5:30 in the morning and with people standing all around him," said Poston. "He couldn't go, so they gave him a lot of water and 30 minutes later, he did."

Don't laugh. Torrie Cox, a University of Pittsburgh cornerback, also was flagged for a positive test because of diluted urine. Cox's agent, Peter Schaffer, also claims that his client's excessive consumption of water -- primarily to deal with the demands of the three-day combine -- caused the positive test.

"This is ridiculous," said Schaffer. "I guess it means I'm representing a water abuser."

The NFL would not comment or confirm the positive tests for either player. But in a letter sent to Cox that Schaffer provided for ESPN, league doctor Lawrence Brown wrote, "Dilute specimens are often the result of drinking extraordinarily large amounts of fluid prior to the provision of a urine specimen. A willful attempt to consume large amounts of liquid to avoid detection of a substance prohibited by the National Football League is treated as a violation equivalent to a positive test under the National Football League Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse."

Greg Aiello, a league spokesman, spoke generally that the league's view on a diluted specimen is, "It is not a masking agent, but it is considered a masking technique."

Team executives had a variety of reactions around the league, but not for acclamation due to the league's confidentiality policy. One general manager thought counting a diluted specimen that contains a large amount of water as a positive test was "ridiculous."

Another GM said that his team doctors and trainers believe the amount of water that is required to constitute a positive test for a diluted specimen "is so high that it's a definite red flag."

"That's why they test players early in the morning when a person generally has the highest concentration of body minerals," the GM added.

Rogers was unavailable for comment but he was among 20 players who visited the Detroit Lions on Monday. The Lions choose second in the draft and are expected to take the Michigan State star, barring an unforeseen circumstance. Lions GM Matt Millen did not elaborate much about the league's documented medical reports from the Combine to all 32 teams. Most teams received the reports Friday.

"All that stuff is going to be between Charles and the National Football League and his agent and that's it," said Millen. "I had a lot of questions (for Rogers). I'm not going to get into what questions I asked. Those are personal and confidential."

Most team executives contacted by ESPN did not believe Rogers' draft status would be hurt because he has no documented off-field problems or reported positive drug tests at Michigan State. The Lions also have an insider's knowledge of Rogers because they hired ex-Spartans head coach Bobby Williams as their new receivers coach.

However, two team executives not affiliated with the Lions did say that Rogers' test will motivate them to dig deeper into his background.

There was some confusion Monday over whether Rogers automatically enters the NFL's substance abuse program. Poston said he did not and Aiello seemed to verify his position when he said a player who tests positive for diluted urine is "subject to possible entry into our program." Both men did agree there would be evaluation by the league's medical doctors under the policy.

However, if Rogers received the same letter dated March 7 as Cox did from Dr. Brown, who oversees the program, then it's a little more vague about Rogers' rights. Brown wrote Cox: "League policy dictates that if and when you sign an NFL contract, periodic and unannounced League-directed urine testing will begin immediately.

You will also be subject to other provisions of the NFL Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse, including a requirement for a comprehensive evaluation, education, and, if necessary, treatment."

Cox is not a high-profile player like Rogers and is projected as a mid-round cornerback prospect. Yet Schaffer said he grew very concerned Monday when a "couple of club execs" suggested the positive diluted urine test was harmful to Cox's draft status.

Schaffer also is livid because he says that letters of appeal to NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue have been ignored.

One letter from Cox's trainer at Pitt says he had three similar positive tests for diluted urine that the trainer later determined were caused by his excessive consumption of water leading up to games. No banned substances were detected in follow-up tests, the trainer told Tagliabue.

Furthermore, Pitt strength coach Dave Kennedy also wrote the commissioner on Cox's behalf, saying he believed the player's diluted sample was based upon "our recommendations to all of our athletes to properly hydrate for the Combine."

"As a common practice for all of our players at the Combine, because of the speed and intensity of drills performed at the Combine and the greater risk of a pull and strain, we feel proper hydration is paramount for any athlete who will participate in the Combine workouts," Kennedy wrote. "I so instructed Torrie to properly hydrate at the Combine. I have been apprised that Torrie('s) drug test came back 'dilute.' It is my professional opinion that this 'dilute' test was a direct result of the instructions given him by our University as it pertains to hydration and not an attempt on Torrie's behalf to mask any illegal drug use."

Cox did take part in all aspects of the Combine's testing regimen. Rogers did not physically work out but made himself available to medical and written exams, as well as some team interviews.


June 15th, 2005, 11:57 pm
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NFL steroid program could also use upgrade
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John Czarnecki / FOXSports.com
Posted: 68 days ago
There really isn't anything the NFL can do about ridding its game of steroid cheaters until it can convince union boss Gene Upshaw to ratchet up the testing procedures ? make the rules tougher and on a par with the Olympics ? and put the new language in a new collective bargaining agreement.
The revelations out of Carolina stunned many in the league that several Panthers actually used steroid creams ? the kinds associated with baseball's Barry Bonds ? and injected stanozolol the week of their Super Bowl loss to the New England Patriots in Houston.

Yesterday NFLPA Exec Director Gene Upshaw reportedly said of the current league steroid testing program, "If we have to make changes, we are willing to do that." (Nick Wass / Getty Images)
Several of the creams can't be detected by the current NFL test because they leave a person's system within an hour or two after application. Now, these creams aren't as effective as actually injecting growth hormones or testosterone into one's body, but they can strengthen muscles and build muscle mass. Stanozolol, a highly potent anabolic steroid, takes about a week to clear an athlete's system.

Upshaw, who never used steroids as a player, has always been supportive of keeping the game clean on the field. However, it takes time to clear these hurdles with the union because there are legal issues involved, primarily privacy.

For example, two seasons ago four Oakland Raiders were found guilty of using THG when their urine samples were re-tested. That entire situation actually took several months before Commissioner Paul Tagliabue ruled that the four Raiders would be fined at the beginning of the 2004 season. Tagliabue had to reach an agreement with Upshaw and the union. In the end, two of the four players involved were out of the league and never paid a fine.

The NFL Players Association should want to strengthen the testing procedures to rid its game of anabolic steroids and growth hormones. It would also help if more players ? up from ten ? were tested randomly, thus putting more fear in the locker room. In fact, it would be a great move to test the entire locker room sporadically every month.

The downside for the clubs is the money involved in testing. More stringent tests would cost more money. The downside for the league is also accepting the fact that certain cheaters will always beat the system because the drug makers are forever ahead of even the best testing procedures.

But football, for the most part, has been pretty clean on the major-league level. There have been more problems with steroid abuse on the high school level than in the NFL.

Despite the revelations in Carolina, the NFL firmly believes its testing system is working and the Panthers involved are an aberration, not the tip of a bigger steroid scandal. Only time will tell on that last comment.


June 16th, 2005, 12:02 am
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CRog looked more like a wiffle bal bat than a roid user when we drafted him. I watched him play in highschool, he looked the same at MSU only taller.

This year however, I think he has been abusing the whole milk, meat and potatoes drug category. Too much protien will get you a bigger fine than a gun charge, watch your step Charles.


June 16th, 2005, 6:23 am
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MSU was notorious for grass during that era.

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June 16th, 2005, 7:50 am
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Innocent until proven guilty. I manage a number of offices in Texas for my company and have many prospective employees have to take drug tests. Diluted samples are very common, we simply retest. Obviously most of the time a diluted sample means nothing other than the person taking the test has drunk to much water to give a testable sample.

This is a non-story. Even if CRog had done any sort of banned substance, you simply can't drink a ton of water to mask it because you will have to retake the test. I get results back usually within 24 hours, the most he bought himself (if he was trying to) was probably a day or two.

I don't understand the rational of putting someone in the substance abuse policy because of a diluted urine sample - that's simply diluted thinking.

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June 16th, 2005, 9:28 am
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I'm not going to wory about this story, I mean when we drafted him Harrington was bigger then CRog...

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June 16th, 2005, 9:39 am
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Im certainly not trying to insinuate anything with this topic, I just found that article and thought I would share... BTW.. 40 times are so important in the drafting process that the more likely use of a steroid is to enhance your running time..

.... The big name I heard hinted at this year was Jerome Mathis... He ran a 4.32 and had his hammy wrapped up...

I believe Rogers ran a 4.37 at the combine or his pro day


June 16th, 2005, 9:48 am
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too bad millen didnt take the cue and draft andre johnson instead who actually looks like he is on steroids...


June 17th, 2005, 2:45 pm
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The Legend wrote:
too bad millen didnt take the cue and draft andre johnson instead who actually looks like he is on steroids...


Or Terence Newman, whom I wanted.

Or even Terrell Suggs, he would have been nice.

Boo Millen, and I was about to compliment him and his drafting...


June 19th, 2005, 11:26 am
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Weed only stays in the body a month or so I think. The results are confidential. Rogers may have a strike against him, either by the dilluted positive or from the retest. This is only a rumor, but the infamous Erikpipes claimed to have seen Charles indulge in an occasional reefer at MSU football parties. I would take that with a grain of salt, but when you put it all together you can draw your own . . . opinions. To me the difference between the occasional party and the hardcore smoker are pretty large. Obviously Charles is clean now. . . unless he was using O. Smith's prosthetic penis.

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June 19th, 2005, 11:36 am
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