View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently November 24th, 2014, 3:03 am



Reply to topic  [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4
 Gorilla genome could hold key to the human condition 
Author Message
RIP Killer
User avatar

Joined: August 6th, 2004, 9:21 am
Posts: 9519
Location: Dallas
Post Re: Gorilla genome could hold key to the human condition
I love how this author makes a giant leap from saying that a researcher stated
Quote:
just might be an evolutionary “game changer.”


He clearly doesn't understand the meaning of might. He goes on and on to bash claims that this is a "game changer" when that clearly isn't what was said.

Now, based on the article he cites #1 in his footnotes lets see what they said:

ABC News wrote:
"The team says the new species may be the best candidate yet for the immediate ancestor of our genus, Homo," wrote Michael Balter of the Science staff in an overview piece. "That last claim is a big one, and few scientists are ready to believe it themselves just yet."


So scientist don't know exactly what they have yet but this guy is already trying to bash them. :lol:

Then again, consider the source - "The Institute for Creation Research" - no bias there. And consider the author, a former high school teacher in Ovilla, Texas. :lol:

Or we could go to the crux of his argument

Quote:
If this fossil is a real “game changer,” then it should clearly demonstrate human evolution. Otherwise, it’s just an extinct kind of ape. It should show transitional features, such as bones and body proportions that are on their way to becoming shaped like a human’s. It should also be found in earth layers that are significantly below, and that therefore pre-date, evidence of humans. Does this new fossil meet either expectation?


As for his first question, let's quote the original article again
Quote:
include a foot, hand, and parts of the pelvis and skull, could be a "game-changer" in understanding human evolution. They belonged to Australopithecus sediba, a type of pre-human who scientists have said could be an ancestor of modern Homo sapiens. It has characteristics of older members of the Australopithecus family, but also much in common with the newer Homo class, which includes today's human beings.
So the clear answer to his first question is yes it does show bones/body porportions
Quote:
becoming shaped like a human’s.


As for the second question he raises, maybe he should learn some geology and he might understand that deeper doesn't always = older, especially when looking at different areas of the earth. Lakes, oceans, earthquakes, rivers, mountains, etc. all have significant impact on the build up and erosion of Earth/dirt. As a biology teacher, guess I can give him a pass on not understanding geology however.

_________________
Image
LB Tweet


March 30th, 2012, 2:31 pm
Profile WWW
QB Coach
User avatar

Joined: October 26th, 2005, 11:48 pm
Posts: 3039
Location: Elkhart, In.
Post Re: Gorilla genome could hold key to the human condition
As I said I didn't fully read it, but thought based upone what I'd read that it worked with your China man post. I still don't fully understand the whole process, but find it pretty interesting how we have a lot of rabbits to chase. Scripture states that God uses the simple things to confound the smart. I only bring that up, because if God is Omnicient, all knowing, wouldn't you think that all of these little things are just "chaff"? Things meant to get us chasing our tail? I don't want this to become a religious topic, because that disrupts the flow and meaning of the thread. So maybe I'd better stop here, as I can't see how to proceed without interjecting my faith.


What about the first article I posted? Why is there so much discredit placed upon ICR, is it because of their stance? Blue said roughly the same thing about answers in Genesis, and I was curious as to why that is?

_________________
2 Chronicles 10:14, "if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land."


March 30th, 2012, 3:49 pm
Profile
Player of the Year - Defense

Joined: September 13th, 2007, 12:43 pm
Posts: 2747
Post Re: Gorilla genome could hold key to the human condition
Quote:
What about the first article I posted? Why is there so much discredit placed upon ICR, is it because of their stance? Blue said roughly the same thing about answers in Genesis, and I was curious as to why that is?


It would be like a study suggesting that it's healthy to eat red meat every single day. Funded by the American Cow Farmers Association.

They are a biased organization. They have an explicit agenda.

There are legitimate debates within the scientific community about evolution. But not over whether or not god made the earth in seven days or if the grand canyon was formed by Noah's flood.

They are over things like the pace of evolution--does it occur slowly over millions of years, or in bands of equilibrium punctuated with short periods of rapid change? How important are extinctions and how often do they occur (it was once thought that 90% of all organisms had gone extinct, that number has slowly moved up, and now it is broadly believed that over 99% of every organism that ever existed has gone extinct) etc etc.

Here, read this:
http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrar ... ns_faq.php


April 2nd, 2012, 12:51 am
Profile
RIP Killer
User avatar

Joined: August 6th, 2004, 9:21 am
Posts: 9519
Location: Dallas
Post Re: Gorilla genome could hold key to the human condition
LA Times wrote:
Scientists map genome of the bonobo, a key human relative
The work should help researchers better understand how humans evolved, experts say.

Researchershave assembled the complete genome of the bonobo, an African ape that is one of humans' closest relatives.

The achievement, reported Wednesday in the journal Nature, marks a milestone. Adding the bonobo genome to the already-sequenced human, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan genomes gives scientists a complete catalog of the DNA of all of the so-called great apes.

That should help researchers better understand how humans evolved, scientists said.

"There's a common ancestor that we and these apes were derived from. We want to know what that ancestor looked like," said Wes Warren, a geneticist at Washington University in St. Louis, who was not involved in the research. "By adding the bonobo to the mix, we have a better idea."

Now, with all the great ape sequences complete, scientists can better use genetics to help determine whether a particular trait cropped up for the first time in humans, said Kay Pruefer, a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany.

Pruefer, who was first author of the bonobo genome study, worked with an international team to sequence the DNA of Ulindi, a female bonobo who lives at the Leipzig Zoo.

The work revealed new details about bonobos' early history, he said.

Bonobos and chimps — which are very closely related but behave in strikingly different ways, with bonobos relying on sex and chimpanzees relying on aggression to resolve conflict — split from each other about 1 million years ago.

Comparing the genome of Ulindi and a few other bonobos with those of chimps from different parts of Africa, Pruefer and his colleagues found that bonobos share similar amounts of DNA with all of them. That suggested that the split between chimps and bonobos was rapid and complete, with little if any mating between neighboring groups of chimps and bonobos, he said. Otherwise, one would have found that the chimps closest to the bonobos' territory would be more genetically similar.

Such a clean break is unusual among apes, he added: Breeding between early humans and Neanderthals, for example, is still evident in the DNA of people living today.

The clean split may have resulted from the formation of the Congo River, which bisected the territory of the species' shared ancestor, the team wrote.

Ancient humans split away from bonobos and chimps about 4.5 million years ago.

Examining Ulindi's DNA alongside the human genome, the team calculated that about 3% of the human genome is more closely related to bonobos or to chimpanzees than those animals are to each other.

That was surprising, Pruefer said, because previous studies of the bonobo genome had suggested that only about 1% of human DNA would be so similar to the apes' DNA.

John Hawks, an anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin who was not involved in the research, said it would be interesting to learn how these genetic differences influenced behavior.

Perhaps the three species' shared ancestor was more like a chimp — and humans and chimps share genes, say, for aggression. Or perhaps the shared ancestor was more like a bonobo, with some other consequence for human traits.

"What branch do humans come from? Is it 'Make love, not war,' or 'Make war, not love'?" Hawks wondered.

But for now, Pruefer said, it remains unclear what genetic differences between humans, chimps and bonobos have any bearing on human traits.

"The genome is a resource for further study. You have to go and test the genes," he said.

He said he expected scientists would soon begin doing just that.


_________________
Image
LB Tweet


June 14th, 2012, 1:01 pm
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.